USSR in WW2

The Russian participation in World War 2, in both the European and Pacific theaters of the war.

USSR in WW2
Call of Duty Black Ops

Who is Nikita dragovich?

A character from Call of Duty: Black Ops. He is a Soviet Army general and World War ll veteran who brainwashes U.S. Marine Corps Captain Alex Mason into assassinating President John F. Kennedy, which he succeeds in doing. Kennedy's death was not the only thing Dragovich wanted, he wished for the downfall of the United States as a superpower.

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World War 2
USSR in WW2
Cold War
Eastern Europe

What did America do when Stalin decided he wanted to control Eastern European countries and make them satellite nations?

The United States made the CIA and sent a bunch of soldiers to reinforce the borders. The CIA killed KGB agents and the military stopped an invasion.

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USSR in WW2
Joseph Stalin
Dictatorship

How was Joseph Stalin a ruthless dictator?

Many consider Stalin to be exactly that. He dealt with the Kulaks, Jews, and what he considered "enemies of the state", in very harsh manners. He was undoubtedly responsible for the deaths of millions (although exactly how many is unknown and highly debated).

He showed no signs of remorse, and the cruel ways in which he dealt with matters during his leadership where the reasons he was thought to be a ruthless dictator.

Well, actually Stalin was not as cruel, as people say now. Today Stalin-haters count every criminal, imprisoned since 24 to 53 as victim of terror. Lists of "repressed" also contain major errors. For example, i found in this list mine grand-grandfather - but he never was imprisoned or oppressed other way and live until 1989.

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USSR in WW2
History of Europe
Russia

Why is Kaliningrad an important port to Russia?

Before WWII Kaliningrad belonged to Germany (earlier Prussia), but in 1945 Russian leader Joseph Stalin wanted to get "kusok giermanskoj ziemli" ("a piece of German ground") and the city was incorporated to Russia. It is an important port because other Russian ports in Baltic Sea are located far in northeast. It was (and still is) a great base for Russian naval forces. But there is one problem - there is no land connection with other parts of Russia.

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USSR in WW2
History of Russia
Soviet Union (USSR)

What is the initials for Soviet Union?

The initials in English are USSR (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics). In the Russian (Cyrillic) alphabet CCCP.

Please note that an apparent "C" is equivalent to an English "S"; the apparent "P" actually is equivalent to English "R") The country's name in Russian was Союз Советский Социалистических Республик, pronounced "Soyuz Sovetskiĭ Sotsialisticheskikh Respublik"

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USSR in WW2
History of Russia
Karl Marx

Was Karl Marx rich?

No, he was the son of a Lawyer of moderate wealth. He was more or less a member of the Middle Class, while Engels was the son of a wealthy business man who gave up much of his wealth to fund his and Marx's work.

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USSR in WW2

How did Stalin prepare for war?

Russian economics has been greatly improved. Many plants was built, capable of producing strategic materials. Constantly developing researchs lead to producing improved weapons, like T-34 and KV tanks. After army purges in 37-38 lots of young and well-educated army officers got promoted and build strong army backbone. All this measures allow USSR to survive first Nazi's crushing blow (with heavy losses, but no other country could defend self at all), gain military strength and win the war.

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World War 2
USSR in WW2
WW2 Allied Powers

Is allies of World War 2 capitalized?

Yes, it is proper to capitalize the Allies. who were

1) the United States

1) Britain

3) USSR

4) Canada

5) New Zealand

6) Australia

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USSR in WW2
Joseph Stalin

Why was Joseph Stalin racist?

Joseph Stalin specifically was not the classic definition of "racist", wherby one ascribes superiority or inferiority to racial divisions in an organized manner. Yet, his "racism" was just as racially-biased, but more so on social class than on ethnicity. Rather, what Joseph Stalin was averse to, much like his nemesis in Nazi Germany, Adolf Hitler, was an organized economic system predominated by Jewish bankers.

There was this imagined 'boogeyman' of Jewish elites, which both Hitler, Stalin, and even much of the U.S. believed, controlled the world's finances in but a few men.

This concept is why Hitler and Stalin chose their "Socialist" policies to dissolve the economic influence. Like Hitler, Stalin also thought the Jews were a threat to the Communist system, and therefore Stalin's power as the General Secretary.

He felt, in the same way that Adolf Hitler did; that the Jewish populous were 'naturally' inclined to exploit the economic difficulties of others, and his pogroms sought to remove an economic discrepancy he saw as inevitable, if the Jews were allowed to remain wholesale in the Soviet Union. Although Stalin did not see the Jews in the same racially-inferior light as the Fascist Nazi Germany regime, he still classified the Jews in the same 'parasitic-natured' class as where Hitler placed them.

Thus, Stalin killed more Russian Jews than the famed National Socialist dictator in the Third Reich, in pursuit of removing their influence.

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USSR in WW2

What date did Russia invade Manchuria?

The two atomic bombs were dropped August 6th and 9th, 1945. I'm almost certain Russia declared war on Japan and moved into occupied Manchuria on August 10th, but correction welcome.

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World War 2
Germany in WW2
USSR in WW2

What happened at the battle of Adowa?

Ethiopian forces successfully defeated the Italians and kept their nation independent. after the war,Menelik continued to stockpile rifles and other modern weapons in case another foreign power challenged Ethiopia's liberty. Do you go to options? lol

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USSR in WW2
History of Russia
Vladimir Lenin
Soviet Union (USSR)

What was life like in Soviet Russia 1917-1991?

To address the question that was actually asked, unlike the other two responses, I can recommend three excellent books, Russia, the People and the Power by Robert G. Kaiser, The Russians by Hedrick Smith, and Behind the High Kremlin Walls by Vladimir Solovyov and Elena Klepikova. Some other good ones include "Mig Pilot", that is by the pilot who flew his fighter to Japan in 1975, I forget his name, "Breaking With Moscow" by Arkady N. Schevchenko and anything by Alexander Solzhenitsyn.Michael Montagne

AnswerWell, apart from the 'purges' of dissidents by those evil few with power in their hands - and over the years that meant killings by the million - life for the common people meant that they were well educated and well cared-for, and always knew where their next meal was coming from, which should be all that matters.

That is more than you can say for now, with our grab-as-grab-can society imposed on them via just one or two corrupt leaders now retired to fat lives abroad together with those with the riches which those 'leaders' permitted them to scoop from the rest during the few years since '91

Russia is now the ruins of what was a great able and cultured nation only a few years ago. The common people - the vast majority -now live in abject poverty, in a 'market economy', which means you need money to live, and in the Russian climate, which has to be experienced to be believed.

That shows the erosive power of finance in the hands of a few malicious amoral villains. And those are the ones who now rule'our' world.

That should make us think, and see exactly who they are who are now paying all our presidents to do what they want. - Shouldn't it?

AnswerI'm sure that the Soviet government tried their best to provide a comfortable, peaceful and stable life for its citizens. Whether or not they actually did is a different story. Only those who were unswervingly loyal to the Party and its principles reaped the most material benefits. Of course, Party personnel reaped the most, followed by military and police forces. At the bottom of the barrel was the "worker" all of the bureaucrats were claiming to represent. AnswerGreetings from Russia! (Siberia)

Before 1991-93 we (Russians) could be shure in our future, we had guarantees of medical service and education for-free. Also we had normal life level. But we had not enough commodities and products.

After 8 years of anti-Russian "democracy" and wild/criminal capitalism Russian GNP became extremely lower than before that period. People became extremely poor in this 8 years. Economy was almost destroyed.

Now we have true democratically choosen pro-Russian government. And we grow rich and repair our economy.

P.S. Excuse me for my terrible English

AnswerIt is impossible to answer briefly to the question....First it was a cruel civil war and collapse of empire in the beginning, violence, blood, new hopes, -really hard times, after there came a period of modernization which was unseen before in the modern world's history - during a dozen of years ruined collapsed mostly agricultural country became one of the leaders in Europe..but people paid really tremendous price for that - terror, slavery of GULAG, starving villages, it is incredible that the nation was able to survive all that and was capable of real feat to save their country, what the Soviet people experienced in the 30s is almost nothing in comparison with terrors of the WWII or the Great Patriotic War as it is called in Russia and this nation showed tremendous strength and courage and won its War...Stalin was the most lucky tyran to have Russians under his power......sure there were traitors, there were about 1 million who joined Nazis Russian Liberation Army, some of them really thought that Russia should be saved from Stalin's tyrany, but if the Nazis won there were not be Russia any more...9th of May was a real triumph of soviet people, not of the criminal system that ruled them...and this country was ruined, devastated, lost millions of people - incredible, but it was the first to send a sattelite and human being in space - sure, there were lots of politics about that, but it was one more real triumph, the 60-x to my mind is the best time in the entire history of the USSR...main reason- people got much more freedom after the tyrany, after the 70s the country started slowly to slide to its collapse...corruption, decay of political elite, exhausting arms race with the US, fear of truth, time of inefficiency and incompetence...but collapse of the USSR just accelerated degradation in most of the former soviet republics, and this decay is not stopped yet...in the end of the 80s we had better health care sytem, better education, our science was on a higher level and the nation was less corrupted, simply people lived longer than now in Russia
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USSR in WW2
History of Russia
Slogans and Mottos

Peace land bread?

In early July 1917 in Russia the new Provisional Government that took control after the abdication of the Tsar launched a major offensive in the war effort in Galicia in hope it would increase its power and influence, it was disastrous and in Petrograd dissatisfaction with the regime culminated in the spontaneous July Days riots, by industrial workers and soldiers. The revolutionary group the Bolsheviks lead by V.I.Lenin seized upon this and introduced a new slogan "Peace, Land and Bread". On the 7th of November that year the Bolsheviks stormed the Winter Palace seizing power in Petrograd, Lenin set up his new government called the Sovnakom (Council of People's Commissars). But he knew that to stay in power he had to push ahead with the measures he had promised: to end the war (peace), to give land to the peasants (land) and to get food to the cities (bread). Otherwise, his support would disappear.

In the first year of the war Russia had lost 4 million men, by 1917 the situation on the war front and back at home was becoming worse. With the 15million men being taken out of the farming industry to fight in the war food shortages became apparent. Bread rations had gone down for 1 ounce per a day in March to ¼ of an ounce per a day in October for the people at home. Fuel also along with food had been diverted to the war front, which led to cold hungry people at home becoming desperate and wanting for the war to end. Conditions on the war front weren't much better and Lenin knew that Russia had to pull out of the war. With Lenin's promise of 'Peace" he had gained many supporters who had wanted the war to end. Thus when Lenin finally became in power he had to keep this promise or he would of lost much of his support and may have lost power.

Lenin sent his Commissar of war Leon Trotsky to meet with the Germans and negotiate a peace treaty. Trotsky at first walked away from the meeting because he thought the Germans had demanded too much in the treaty. However, Lenin told Trotsky that he must sign the treaty because he knew that the Bolsheviks would only stay in power if the war were to end quickly. The result was harsh- 'The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk' that was issued in March 3rd 1918 marking Russia's final withdrawal from World War I as an enemy of her co-signatories, fulfilling, on unexpectedly humiliating terms, a major goal of the Bolshevik revolution of November 7, 1917. But although the fulfilment of peace was completed, the very land given up had great economic importance, as they were some of the most fertile farming areas in Western Russia. Lenin did argue that the treaty was harsh but with the withdrawal of Russia from the war it meant he could focus more on maintaining his power and fulfilling the other promises.

When the Tsar had abdicated on the 15th or March 1917, the peasants believed that at last they could achieve their dream - to own their own land. But the Provisional Government would not give it to them. So Lenin promised in his slogan "Peace, Land and Bread" that if the Bolsheviks were to gain power they would redistribute land to the peasants and give them power within their rural communities and they would set up workers soviets in factories which would work to improve the working conditions and general lifestyles of those who worked in the industrial cities. Such a mixture of beliefs was genuinely popular in both urban and rural areas and it also ensured that the Bolsheviks appealed to the two largest social groups in Russia. So in November after the Bolsheviks had assumed power, a decree was passed taking all the land away from the Tsar and the old landlords. Land was given to the peasants, who would form committees to divide it up evenly. With the majority of the population in Russia being peasants it was certain that Bolsheviks needed to appeal to them to gain their support. The offer of land being given back to the peasants was an important factor in the Bolsheviks gaining power.

By 1917 hunger and starvation was gripping Russia. Food and fuel supplies had stopped being sent to the cities and were on train to the war front to support the soldiers fighting in WW1. Many people in Russia were sick of the war and sick of being cold and hungry. Food rations had become very strict and people had become desperate. When Lenin introduced his slogan "Peace, Land and Bread" he had promised to get bread to the cities. When he came into power he made it an absolute priority to fulfil this promise. But when peasants didn't want to sell their produce at the prices demanded by the Bolsheviks because they believed they were to low and they would be unable to make a living of the income, so he sent out the 'Cheka' to take it the food by force. The Cheka was Lenin's secret police that arrested people who were considered dangerous or doing the wrong thing. So although food was sent to the cities to feed the hungry, peasants weren't happy with the prices paid for their goods. Yet it was still essential that the Bolsheviks promised what the majority of people wanted. And that was bread.

The Tsarist rule in Russia had already been overthrown in the February Revolution of 1917, but the problems that had led to that revolution persisted even with the new government. In three words, Lenin captured the needs of the Russian people and convinced them that he and his Bolsheviks would satisfy their demands to the extent that many but not all were willing to support him in setting up another government. But he knew that to stay in power he had to push ahead with the measures he had promised: to end the war (peace), to give land to the peasants (land) and to get food to the cities (bread). Otherwise, his support would disappear. Lenin did fulfil these promises and they were a huge factor in his party gaining the support he needed to take over the Provisional Government.

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USSR in WW2
Military Terminology
Slogans and Mottos

What is the Spetsnaz Motto?

Any mission, any time, any place

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Korean War
World War 1
USSR in WW2

What the number of casualties of the Korean War?

See website: Korean War
"The Department of Defense reports that 54,246 American service men and women lost their lives during the Korean War." (source:http://www.abmc.gov/abmc46.htm) There were 4 million military and civilian casualties: 33,600 Americans 16,000 UN allies 415,000 South Koreans 520,000 North Koreans 900,000 Chinese (estimated)

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USSR in WW2
Cold War
US in WW2
Soviet Union (USSR)

What incident in 1960 heightened cold war tensions between the US and the Soviet Union?

Newly appointed Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev threatened the United States to nuclear damnation several times throughout the year. The following year, the already strained relationship between the US and the Soviet Union came to a breaking point when, in 1961, the Soviets pledged total support to Fidel Castro in the famed Bay of Pigs incident.

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World War 2
World War 1
USSR in WW2

Where were the religious leaders during World War 2?

Jesus, knowing the hearts of men, gave prophetic warnings as given in Matthew 24:6:

6And ye shall hear of wars and rumours of wars: see that ye be not troubled: for all these things must come to pass!!!


If your question was really "Why did theologians, priests, preachers, and pastors not oppose WW II?", many did, especially in Germany, where some of them were sent to the camps.

Answer
During WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, and the Gulf War, the clergy were right there in the battles with the men. They were on board naval vessels and near the front lines; obviously, they could not be in the planes so they gave the crews their blessings before the flights. Some of the crews would ask the clergy to bless their aircraft for them which the clergy gladly did. Answer
Hitler was a selfish pagan leader who exploited the German people by promoting National Socialism, or Nazism. Because he used Christian imagery and Christian churches to promote his agenda, some people believe him to have been a Christian. Did Hitler ever talk about Jesus Christ or the Grace of God? The true Christians were people like Karl Barth, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Paul Tillich who voiced their outright opposition to National Socialism or were otherwise persecuted for their faith.
Please look up the Barmen Declaration for more information. Someone mentioned the Balfour Declaration, which would be the answer to a similar question about World War I. ANSWER
During World War II, the religious leaders of all nations prayed for victory and blessed the armies even though people of the same religion were often on opposing sides killing one another. There are pictures of Catholic Priests with many other religious priests mingling with world rulers and rubbing their shoulders so to speak, showing their approval for war. Jesus set a fine example when he told Peter to "return his sword."
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USSR in WW2
US in WW2

What are the causes of man- made disasters?

The causes of man made disasters are:

1. ignorance

2. unawareness

3. illiteracy

4. carelessly handling of dangerous chemicals,weapons,etc

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Germany in WW2
USSR in WW2

Why did Hitler attack Russia?

Hitler spoke of the inevitable battle of philosophies (fascism vs. communism) and races (Germanic vs. Slavic) for decades and wrote about the coming war between Germany and Russia in Mein Kampf and other places. Much of the early war was setting the stage for the final meeting of the totalitarian philosophies (Poland was split between the two, Germany wanted to secure the western front with France and England before invading Russia) which was viewed by Hitler as the main battle of his great war.

Of course, Germany was not able to destroy or disable England (which would have discouraged the Americans for getting involved, he felt) and thus attacking Russia opened up a gigantic second front and eventually stretched the Germans to breaking point. The great, inevitable struggle became Hitler's downfall.

The frightening thing is how close Russia was to collapsing as the Germans rolled towards Moscow. They very nearly won.

AnswerThe main reason for Operation Barbarosa was to give Germany living space to expand. Hitlers plan was to make the Slavs living in Russia (up to the Urals at least) 'disappear' except for the ones he kept around as servants for the new German residents he would send in to colonize. The plan was to send in German far families after the war was won who would have alot of kids who would be able to supply the German army with millions of new recruits in the future. AnswerAdolf Hitler needed more resources for its hungry machines. Germany has a small area, with little supplies. USSR(Russia) was rich in oil and other resources, Germany needed that resource to continue the war. Also, if Hitler wanted to control Europe, he must take down USSR, it was the largest country in Europe as well as the world. AnswerHitler wanted land in the east for the German people to expand into and settle on. He regarded Slavs, like the Russians, as inferior subhumans. Therefor he thought there was absolutely nothing wrong, indeed it was the right of the German people, with invading Russia, enslaving or exterminating the population, and settling Germans on the empty land. He also thought that the inherent superiority and racial purity of the German people would make it easy to defeat the inferior Russians. AnswerHitler believed the Bolsheviks were a cause of Germany losing WWI. And Hitler also thought that if he was able to defeat Russia, that Britain would succumb to the power of Germany and surrender. AnswerThe invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941 was a result of several things. Firstly, Hitler regarded the Slavic population as 'untermensch' or sub-human, and believed that the Aryan German race should have 'living space' or lebensraum in the East. Moreover, Hitler believed, as with many other leading Nazis, that Germany's defeat in WW1 was a result of a Jewish-Bolshevik conspiracy, and that the threat of this needed to be purged. Thus, as a communist nation, the USSR was a likely target for invasion. AnswerHitler always hated the USSR specifically, because he detested Communism. His plans to invade were revealed as early as 1924 when he wrote his political testament, "Mein Kampf". The specific timing is probably as a result of the early German successes in the war: Hitler got over-confident. AnswerBoundless expansion in Russia had been Hitler's dream ever since 1918. AnswerAll of the current friendus do not reflect the new information that has come from the Soviet archives and the German archives that the soviets took back to Russia after WWII.

There is much new information that has come from Russian historians that have searched these archives and painstakingly documented what really happened and are now trying to set the record straight.

There are reams of evidence that Stalin was less than 2 weeks from invading NAZI occupied Europe and it was Stalin's intention to take the whole thing. Hitler knew this. He also knew that the Russian war machine was decisively better equipped for offensive operations and many times more powerful than the German army tank for tank.

The personal reasons that Hitler invaded are also true but the only hope of survival for the Nazis and was a preemptive strike on the Russian army which was all bunched up at the border and poised to invade with no defensive plans or training.

The evidence is overwhelming and I will not be argumentative or disparage any of the other friendus. They are also true but only tell a part of the picture.

_____

The information about a planned preemptive Soviet strike comes almost entirely from Victor Suvorov, who defected to the West in 1978. There's this strange notion that because he was a defector had privileged knowledge of Soviet history. In fact the information that he 'revealed' was already in the public domain at the time.

After the fall of France in 1940 the Soviet general staff opted for 'forward defense' but the proportion of troops based near the western frontier of the Soviet Union was nowhere near enough what would have been needed for a preemptive strike.

I wonder of the person who is making these claims above can name a couple of respected historians of World War 2 who support this claim.

Note the following comment from the Wikipedia article on Suvorov's Icebreaker :

"Summarizing the western scholars' opinion on IcebreakerHugh Ragsdale concludes that the book is "generally considered discredited" by now, whereas Jonathan Haslam notes that Suvorov's claims "would be comical were it not taken so seriously".

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USSR in WW2

For how many years was russia under communist control?

74 years.

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Korean War
USSR in WW2
Cold War
Soviet Union (USSR)

How did the different political systems cause the Cold War between the United States and Soviet Union?

There are two different ways to view the Cold War. One is that the Cold War is nothing unique-two very powerful nations were playing the Great Game in search of global domination. Certainly the foreign policy objectives of the USSR were similar to the Russian monarchy-such as an Eastern European buffer zone and a warm-water port not located on the Pacific Rim.

The second way to view the Cold War is as an ideological struggle between two competing world views-capitalist democracy vs. socialist totalitarianism. The Soviets were terrified the West sought to overthrow Communism, and the US and her allies were convinced that the Soviets would spread Communism around the world by whatever means necessary. Both sides were armed with enough nuclear warheads to destroy most of humanity-raising the stakes to an apocalyptic level.

Both sides had the seeds of conflict inherent within their own political systems. In the United States, the fear of the Soviet threat was played up for electoral advantage. John Kennedy won election over Nixon in part by playing up fear of a non-existent "Bomber Gap" and "Missile Gap". Presidents often used fear of Communism to force an agenda through a stalemated Congress. It was easier to focus on the foreign threat rather than deal with many domestic problems.

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World War 2
Germany in WW2
USSR in WW2
Adolf Hitler

Why did Hitler open up the eastern front?

There were a number of reasons why Hitler attacked the Soviet Union along the eastern front. None of the reasons seems quite logical or reasonable today.

Hitler's book, Mein Kampf ('My Struggle'), described his belief that the Slavs were occupying land that rightfully belonged to the Germans. He believed that Greater Germany needed room to live and grow ('lebensraum').

Although he had a mutual non-aggression treaty with Stalin, Hitler had grown frustrated with the war in the west. He and his military leaders thought that they could cause Britain to sue for peace with bombing and submarine warfare, but by 1942 this had not occurred. He therefore shifted military resources to the east, even though he had hoped to not fight a two front war.

Hitler felt (correctly) that the Stalin regime was weak from numerous purges and that people in the central and eastern European republics (Ukraine, Belarus, etc.) would not fight for Stalin, which proved mostly false. He wanted to take the oil fields in what is now Iran and Iraq. He wanted the gas fields in Ukraine.

He also felt that Communism was totally at odds with National Socialism, and represented the greatest ongoing threat to European security.

No matter the reason, what ensued was a horrifying year-long drive deep into the Soviet territory, deaths of many millions, and finally the two-year Soviet counteroffensive campaign that destroyed nearly everything in its path to Berlin.

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USSR in WW2
Authors, Poets, and Playwrights
Poetry

I want practical criticism of poem'middle age' written by Indian poet kamala das?

Write a review of the poem Middle Age. Kamala Das is a welknown Indian poet writing in English. As a writer, she made bold attempts to break the traditional shell of Indian woman with her fiery tone and confessional mode of writing. She takes reader to her confidence and opens her mind before them. In her poem, Middle Age she tells us her feeling as a mother. She tries to bring out the loneliness that she feels at her middle age. In the opening of the poem, she tells us that one's middle age is when his children become a critic all that he does. At this age the children lashes their tongue without any mercy. They use harsh language towards their parents. This change in their attitude is beautifully compared to the transformation that happens to pupae in a cocoon. The children emerge in harsh adult glory. They do not need their mothers except for serving tea and pressing their dress. The mothers do not take this change as something very natural. They need the company of their children all the same. They miss their children very badly. In their loneliness, they touch books and other things of their children. They weep a little secretly. They can only dream of the days when they narrated many animals' stories to their children. As they remember those days, they can only cry in their present helplessness. It gives them a realisation that they are no longer as young as they used to be. It reminds them that it is the time to wake up from the daydreams. This poem is written in free verse. It is written in a conversational tone. The rhythm of the poem takes us to a dreamy world of a lonely mother. The visual imageries in the poem like the pupae coming out the cocoon and the jungle stories written in golden ink are very remarkable. The reader gets such a picture in his mind. It also takes us back to our child hood when we used to listen to such stories from our parents. At the end of the poem, she comes to a realisation that things are different in their middle age. This poem can be taken as an effort of the mother to accept the harsh reality in one's life that as the children grow up, the parents grow old. The mother is helpless at the callousness shown by the children. In this poem, Kamala Das portrays the generation gap that happens in the relationship of mothers and children in a touching way. It also reveals her most sensitive heart before the reader.

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Germany in WW2
USSR in WW2
History of Russia
Joseph Stalin

What did Joseph Stalin think about the Intelligentsia?

Based on his speech at 1937 in Bolshoi Theatre, Stalin said that the intelligentsia class were necessary to help him fulfill state's tasks.

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War and Military History
USSR in WW2
Joseph Stalin

Stalin's secret police?

Cheka (Chrezvychaynaya Komissiya, Extraordinary Commission), from 1917.

NKVD (Narodnyy komissariat vnutrennikh del,People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs) 1934-1954.

After Stalin's death in 1953:

KGB (Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti, Committee for State Security) 1954-1991.

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