Mythology

This category is for questions about the ancient stories and myths of past civilizations.

Asked in Mythology, Greek and Roman Mythologies

Where does the Greek goddess Atlanta live?

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Atlanta isn't a person but Atalanta is. However, she had royalty parents and married only someone who could beat her in a race. She was beaten by her husband who she loved very much even before the race. If he didn't succeed he would be b-headed.
Asked in Mythology, Cryptids and Legendary Creatures

What can a lion with wings be called?

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It is called a Gryphon. There are different spellings, Gryfin,Gryphon, whatever. A Gryphon can also be a lion with eagle wings and head.
Asked in Fables and Folklore, Mythology, Greek and Roman Mythologies

Why are myths made?

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To explain a practice or belief, to include a story as part of a people's traditions and culture or to make something up for whatever purpose are among the reasons for why myths are made. Specifically, a myth may explain a belief in the end of the world. For example, the Doomsday belief may trace back to some ancient person seeing the rise and fall of civilizations and applying that cycle of creation and destruction on a global or universal level. Or a myth may be a way by which a people distinguishes themselves from perceived outsiders. For example, the ancient Greek and Roman legends and myths were ways of uniting the peoples of Greece and then of Rome. The stories provided a common set of gods, a common reference point by which Greeks and hen Romans led their lives. Or a myth may be an opportunity for letting the imagination run wild and making something up for any number of reasons. For example, a myth may be a story that is made up about one's supposedly superhuman powers and abilities.
Asked in Books and Literature, Mythology, Libraries and Library History

How did books evolve?

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In very ancient times people kept track of their live-stock using pebbles.(Easier to count then the actual duck or sheep or cattle themselves.) It was easier to keep such pebbles in a bag or a cup for later reference. It has been suggested that one day an unfired clay cup was being used and the person using it found that the pebbles stuck (rather conveniently) to the sides, making sorting easier. From there the cup became a flat slab of clay (easier to get your hands around) and the impression that the pebbles made in the wet clay made a permanent record of the transaction of the day. The pebbles became obsolete as it was found that a stylus could be used to make the impressions just as easily. The first books therefore were ledgers. As hieroglyphics were invented to keep track of the different types of inventory and of the people associated with transactions, stories became possible to record. The Egyptians replace clay with papyrus (much easier to carry around) and of course could be rolled-up. These were the first scrolls. A scroll however has to be rolled out beginning to end and people found that a pile of short scrolls were easier to reference than a single large, long one, so they actually began cutting scrolls up into shorter lengths (shudder) and affixing all pieces to only one post. This was the earliest 'spine' of books. From here I'm sure how you can see further incremental improvements were made. All these stages (except the wet clay cup) have been recorded as being in use as the more advanced portions of the world observed the more primitive portions. There are still today 'rancher' who keep track of their livestock using pebbles.
Asked in Greek and Roman Mythologies, Mythology

What is a half bird and half horse animal?

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A Hippogriff. A Pegasus is just a winged horse.
Asked in Mythology, Greek and Roman Mythologies

When were Greek Myths written?

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Since there was lots of writers and Greek myths, we can't be certain. But it's certainly a time between 500,000 and 0 BCE.
Asked in Mythology, Fable (video game)

What do you call a fable fellow?

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If the Fable Fellow is Ben Kingsly of the new video game 'Fable 3,' "who is playing a wizard character who is the king of Mist Peak." You call him Sir as he's been knighted.
Asked in Mythology

What is hoods weapon?

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GAT : Old slang, meaning gun
Asked in Mythology

What mythical creatures did Tolkien make up?

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Hobbits Ents Orcs Balrog There are really too many to list. Try checking out the Tolkien Bestiary; the book is gigantic.
Asked in Mythology, Fairy Tales

Is the rabbit and the turtle race tale a tall tale?

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Yes, but it teaches children morals such as 'slow and steady wins the race'.
Asked in Mythology, Aesop's Fables

What all the gods of fire deity?

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Gods of Fire Ho-Masubi (Kagu-Tsuchi) - Japanese Agni - Hindu Loki - Norse Hephaestus - Greek Prometheus - Greek Lugh - Irish Celtic (Sun god) Vulcan - Roman Goddesses of Fire Pele - Hawaiian Hestia - Geek Vesta - Roman Brigid - Celtic Chantico - Aztec
Asked in Mythology

What was Sisyphus's crime?

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Sisyphus was one of the sons of King Aeolus of Thessaly. He and his brother Salmoneus hated one another, and Sisyphus tried endlessly to kill his brother. He established a kingdom at Corinth and instituted the Isthmian Games. Often, though, he would have travelers to his kingdom killed and their possessions seized, which was against the Laws of Xenia, the Greek concept of hospitality. That wasn't what did it, though. He was also considered one of the craftiest mortals to have ever lived. In one of his plots to kill his brother, Sisyphus seduced Tyro because the oracle said she would bear him a son that would kill Salmoneus. Upon discovering this, Tyro killed the child. He also inspired the ire of Zeus by telling the river god Asopus the whereabouts of his daughter (whom Zeus had abducted) in exchange for the placement of a spring in Corinth. For this, Zeus decreed that he be chained in Tartarus. But that wasn't the crime either. You see, before he was chained, Sisyphus asked Thanatos, god of death, to demonstrate the strength of the chains, and while he did, Sisyphus fastened them, binding death so no one could die. Ares eventually intervened because war without death is meaningless. BUt that wasn't it either. Before he was taken again by Thanatos, he ordered his wife to toss his naked body into the middle of the public square as a sign of her devotion and love. Of course, this violated the normal burial practices. When he arrived in the Underworld, he complained to Persephone that his wife deserved to be punished by him for her thoughtless act; a wish that was granted. Sisyphus gladly returned to Corinth to scold his wife, but when his spirit refused to return, Hermes was sent to being him back forcibly. Because of his many attempts to escape death and the rule of the Underworld, Sisyphus was told he could never leave again until he placed a large boulder soundly at the top of a steep hill. His punishment is that whenever he nears the top, the boulder shifts and escapes him, rolling to the bottom again. So arduous and continuous is his labor that it became cliche.
Asked in Religion & Spirituality, Mythology

What does it mean when the grim reaper does not carry his scythe?

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He becomes the grim sower of course, a little known facet of his persona.
Asked in Women's Health, Menstruation, Mythology, Fables and Folklore

What are the myths and facts about menstruation?

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Myth - You can't get pregnant on your period. Fact - Ovulation can happen at any time, especially if periods aren't regular. Myth - You can't get pregnant without regular, or a first period. Fact - Ovulation and fertilization CAN occur before regular, or first bleeding. Myth - Menstrual cycles should always be 28 days. Fact - They vary woman to woman, 28 days is an average only. Myth - Menstruating women need to be in bed, or avoid strenuous activity. Fact - Exercise can help with symptoms, it will not make pain worse. Women are not weaker during their periods, unless they have anemia, which is caused by an abnormal loss of blood during menstruation. Myth - All women have terrible periods. Fact - Most women find that the discomfort is minimal and does not stop them from regular activities they enjoy. Some women do have more pain or other symptoms then others. Myth - You should not have sex while on your period. Fact - If both partners are willing, there is no medical reason not to, and orgasm can sometimes relieve cramping. Myth - A bath causes or worsens menstrual cramps Fact - A warm bath can soothe and relax muscles, reducing pain. Myth - Women menstruating can catch cold easily and should avoid cold water or iced drinks. Fact - Cold can make pain worse for some, but you will not get a cold. Myth - You should not get your feet wet during your period. Fact - See above; this one was made popular by Tampax booklets and other literature of yesteryear. Myth - Women taking birth control pills "need" to have a period. Fact - Women on the pill do not experience uterine build up and do not need to have a period to shed the lining. The bleeding occurring with the pill is not a "real" menstrual period, and is not necessary for a woman's health. Myth - Women are always moody, bitchy, and irrational during menstruation. Fact - Not all women experience PMS symptoms or the same symptoms. You can't explain all women's moods by being "that time of the month". Women are just as capable during menses as at any other time, they are not mentally fragile. Myth - Women on their period are more likely to be attacked by bear, sharks, ect. Fact - This is just silly, and an urban legend not based on any scientific research. Myth - Hair will not hold a curl, or should not be washed during your period. Fact - Not sure where it can from, but this myth is just superstition. Myth - Menstrual Blood smells bad. Fact - Pads and Tampon cause blood to develop an odor as bacteria build, not blood itself. Blood does not smell fishy or strongly itself. Myth - Menstrual Blood is toxic or unclean Fact - It is no more unclean then any other blood, tampons do not keep dirty blood in the body. No extra cleansing or deodorants are needed - this is marketing to fears. Myth - You should not eat certain foods (ie meat, dairy) while menstruating. Fact - Eat what you like, it will not harm you in any way. If fact vitamins can help ease pain for some, so eat meat for the iron, milk for the calcium. Myth - A pregnant women never bleeds. Fact - Spotting or mild bleeding can be normal, but see a doctor at once to be sure. Myth - Short periods (three days or less) or irregularity of periods means a woman is infertile or abnormal Fact - The length of the period is not an indicator of fertility, it is different for everyone Myth - Virgins or young women can't use tampons. Fact - The hymen stretches, if you want to use tampons at any time or age, you can. Virginity does not end when you use a tampon. Myth - Doing *fill in anything* will shorten or delay a period Fact - Eating particular foods, exercising, fasting, bathing, skipping rope, will not lengthen or shorten a period.
Asked in Mythology, Gulliver's Travels

Why were the Lilliputians at war?

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A disagreement over which end you should open your eggs from. There were bigenders and littlenders.
Asked in Books and Literature, Mythology

What is the theme for the book Flush?

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he theme is determination. it is this because the kids never stopped and they figured out the coral queen mystery.
Asked in Mythology, Cowboy Movies and Westerns, Definitions

From the book lonesome dove the quote uva uvam vivendo varia fit was used what does it mean?

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I have read that Larry McMurty purposely used incorrect Latin because of his characters(Gus wrote the phrase on the sign). The scrambled meaning of the phrase translates to a "grape changes color [i.e., ripens] when it sees [another] grape." This would explain why Gus says "you ride with an outlaw you die with an outlaw" when they catch Jake with the horse thieves, meaning that you show your true colors in the presence of others. From what I have read, it means something along the lines of "one vine becomes the whole vine" or "one grape causes the others to ripen". In essence, I believe that McMurtry was trying to convey the legacy of Gus and Call and the importance of friendship and companionship. From what I have read, it means something along the lines of "one vine becomes the whole vine" or "one grape causes the others to ripen". In essence, I believe that McMurtry was trying to convey the legacy of Gus and Call and the importance of friendship and companionship. ANOTHER VIEW The sign for the Gus and Call's Hat Creek Cattle Company includes the Latin motto "Uva Uvam Vivendo Varia Fit" which appears to be a reference to a proveb ("Uva Uvam Videndo Varia Fit") first attributed Juvenal. Juvenal's proverb is translated as "A grape (uva) other grapes (uvam) seeing (videndo) changes (varia fit)." Some readers think McMurty's substitution of "vivendo" for "videndo" is an artifice McMurty used to underscore Gus's lack of education and unfamiliarity with Latin. That seems unlikely. When Call asks Gus about the motto, Gus jumbles it comically and does not even pretend to know what it means. Having established that, McMurty gained nothing by adding a spelling error that only Latin scholars would catch. Likewise, it seems unlikely - as other readers have suggested - that the substitution was simply a typographical error. Although the substitution is ungrammatical, "vivendo" means "living" so the effect is that the motto is changed from "A grape changes when it sees other grapes" to "A grape is changed by living with other grapes" or, since we are not really concerned with grapes after all, "We are changed by the lives around us." ELABORATION: They were settled in in Lonesome Dove and had an environment they were comfortable in and that they understood. Capt. Call wanted to see Montana and in doing so changed all of the lives around him. One ripple in time changed all their lives. Lonesome Dove as Tragedy It's difficult to know what a writer is thinking, regardless of how "obvious" their meaning seems to be. There is a number of plausible explanations for the novel's title, but McMurtry's -- that it refers to Newt! -- seems wayward, if not downright perverse. Because Lonesome Dove is such a beloved work, people overlook the fact that it's an extremely unhappy story. (McMurtry even said that he didn't understand why such a depressing novel was so popular.) Almost every character has their life lost, destroyed, or "merely" badly damaged (Newt being the obvious exception), simply because they went on an unnecessary journey. Xavier Wantz's grisly, gratuitous suicide is typical of McMurtry's delight in torturing his characters (both physically and psychologically). However pompous it might sound, I think of Lonesome Dove as "The Wizard of OZ meets Das Lied von der Erde". It therefore seems reasonable that this (mis-)quote is consciously meant ironically. The very thing that does not happen is that (with the exception of Newt), there is no "ripening". People are no different -- no "riper" -- at the end of the story than they were at the beginning, either because of other peoples' examples (videndo) or simply their passage through life (vivendo). No one changes, no one matures.
Asked in Books and Literature, Mythology, Greek and Roman Mythologies, Hera (Juno)

What equivalent Roman god was Hera?

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Hera was the Greek equivalent of the Roman goddess Juno.
Asked in Mythology, Fables and Folklore

What are all gods of Love and Lust deity?

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Albanian folklore Prende, goddess of love Armenian mythology Astghik, goddess of fertility and love Aztec mythology Xochiquetzal, goddess of fertility, beauty, and female sexual power Buddhism Aizen Myō-ō or Rāgarāja, a deity who transforms worldly lust into spiritual awakening; his red-skinned appearance represents suppressed lust and passion Canaanite mythology Astarte, goddess of sexual love, fertility, and warfare Qetesh, goddess of love, beauty and sex Celtic mythology Aine, Irish mythology|Irish]] goddess of love, summer, wealth and sovereignty Cliodhna Irish goddess, sometimes identified as a goddess of love and beauty[1] Chinese mythology Tu Er Shen, a Chinese deity who manages the love and sex between homosexual men Egyptian mythology Bes, god of music, dance, and sexual pleasure Hathor, goddess of the sky, love, beauty, and music Bastet, goddess of felines, love, sexuality, protection, beauty, and dance Etruscan mythology Albina, goddess of the dawn and protector of ill-fated lovers Turan, goddess of love and vitality Greek mythology Aphrodite, goddess of love, lust and beauty The Erotes Anteros, god of requited love Eros, god of love and sexual passion Himeros, god of sexual desire Hedylogos, god of sweet talk and flattery Hymenaios, god of marriage and marriage feasts Pothos, god of sexual longing, yearning and desire Peitho, personification of persuasion and seduction Guaraní mythology Kurupi, god of sexuality and fertility Hindu mythology Kamadeva, god of love Rati, goddess of passion and lust Lithuanian mythology Milda, goddess of love and freedom Mesopotamian mythology Inanna or Ishtar, goddess of sexual love, fertility, and warfare[2] Moroccan mythology Qandisa, goddess of lust who first seduces men then drives them insane[3] Norse mythology Freyja, goddess associated with love, beauty, fertility, gold, seiðr, war, and death Freyr, worshipped as a phallic fertility god, he was said to "[bestow] peace and pleasure on mortals" Sjöfn, goddess associated with love Roman mythology Cupid, the Roman equivalent of the Greek god Eros Venus, the Roman equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite Slavic mythology Dogoda, Polish spirit of the west wind, associated with love and gentleness Dzydzilelya, Polish goddess of love and marriage and of sexuality and fertility Lada, fakeloric goddess of harmony, merriment, youth, love and beauty, who almost certainly never existed Siebog, god of love and marriage Živa, goddess of love and fertility Vodou Baron La Croix, loa of the dead and sexuality Baron Samedi, loa of the dead, sex and resurrection Erzulie Freda Dahomey, loa of love, beauty, jewelry, dancing, luxury, and flowers Yoruba mythology Mami Wata, a pantheon of water deities sometimes associated with love and lust Oshun, goddess of love, intimacy, beauty, wealth and diplomacy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2008) The Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli (1485), depicting Venus, the Roman goddess of love, lust and beauty A love deity is a deity in mythology associated with sexual love, lust or sexuality. Love deities are common in mythology and may be found in many polytheistic religions. Contents [hide] 1 List of love and lust deities 1.1 Albanian folklore 1.2 Armenian mythology 1.3 Aztec mythology 1.4 Buddhism 1.5 Canaanite mythology 1.6 Celtic mythology 1.7 Chinese mythology 1.8 Egyptian mythology 1.9 Etruscan mythology 1.10 Greek mythology 1.11 Guaraní mythology 1.12 Hindu mythology 1.13 Lithuanian mythology 1.14 Mesopotamian mythology 1.15 Moroccan mythology 1.16 Norse mythology 1.17 Roman mythology 1.18 Slavic mythology 1.19 Vodou 1.20 Yoruba mythology 2 References 3 External links List of love and lust deities Albanian folklore Prende, goddess of love Armenian mythology Astghik, goddess of fertility and love Aztec mythology Xochiquetzal, goddess of fertility, beauty, and female sexual power Buddhism Aizen Myō-ō or Rāgarāja, a deity who transforms worldly lust into spiritual awakening; his red-skinned appearance represents suppressed lust and passion Canaanite mythology Astarte, goddess of sexual love, fertility, and warfare Qetesh, goddess of love, beauty and sex Celtic mythology Aine, Irish mythology|Irish]] goddess of love, summer, wealth and sovereignty Cliodhna Irish goddess, sometimes identified as a goddess of love and beauty[1] Chinese mythology Tu Er Shen, a Chinese deity who manages the love and sex between homosexual men Egyptian mythology Bes, god of music, dance, and sexual pleasure Hathor, goddess of the sky, love, beauty, and music Bastet, goddess of felines, love, sexuality, protection, beauty, and dance Etruscan mythology Albina, goddess of the dawn and protector of ill-fated lovers Turan, goddess of love and vitality Greek mythology Aphrodite, goddess of love, lust and beauty The Erotes Anteros, god of requited love Eros, god of love and sexual passion Himeros, god of sexual desire Hedylogos, god of sweet talk and flattery Hymenaios, god of marriage and marriage feasts Pothos, god of sexual longing, yearning and desire Peitho, personification of persuasion and seduction Guaraní mythology Kurupi, god of sexuality and fertility Hindu mythology Kamadeva, god of love Rati, goddess of passion and lust Lithuanian mythology Milda, goddess of love and freedom Mesopotamian mythology Inanna or Ishtar, goddess of sexual love, fertility, and warfare[2] Moroccan mythology Qandisa, goddess of lust who first seduces men then drives them insane[3] Norse mythology Freyja, goddess associated with love, beauty, fertility, gold, seiðr, war, and death Freyr, worshipped as a phallic fertility god, he was said to "[bestow] peace and pleasure on mortals" Sjöfn, goddess associated with love Roman mythology Cupid, the Roman equivalent of the Greek god Eros Venus, the Roman equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite Slavic mythology Dogoda, Polish spirit of the west wind, associated with love and gentleness Dzydzilelya, Polish goddess of love and marriage and of sexuality and fertility Lada, fakeloric goddess of harmony, merriment, youth, love and beauty, who almost certainly never existed Siebog, god of love and marriage Živa, goddess of love and fertility Vodou Baron La Croix, loa of the dead and sexuality Baron Samedi, loa of the dead, sex and resurrection Erzulie Freda Dahomey, loa of love, beauty, jewelry, dancing, luxury, and flowers Yoruba mythology Mami Wata, a pantheon of water deities sometimes associated with love and lust Oshun, goddess of love, intimacy, beauty, wealth and diplomacy

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