Job Search

Searching for a job is never easy and with unemployment rates reaching the highest levels in history, organizing your job search is more important than ever. Using the right search techniques will increase your chances of landing your perfect new career. Ask your questions about searching for jobs and share your knowledge by answering those you can here.

Asked in Job Interviews, Job Applications, Job Search

When a job application asks your reason for leaving a job and were you ever fired what is the best way to answer?

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Answer honestly. That's what all employers are looking for. Just because you were fired doesn't mean you won't get hired. Among the specific suggestions: There was no scope for upward mobility Better opportunity Unresolvable conflicts Not enough hours Personality conflicts Staff reduction/budget cuts Other opinions: They're probably only looking for honesty. If I felt the need to cover it up a little, I would blame it on downsizing, but honesty is the best policy. Be honest. Be prepared to explain (ex. refused to perform certain activities to unsafe working conditions). Was not able to keep up with pace in that type of job due to health issues- ex. repetitive stress injuries. Could also restate question:"My position was terminated in 1995 at xyz because, however, I really enjoyed working there." Never speak badly about previous employers- no matter how much they sucked. Because new employer wouldn't want you leaving and speaking badly about their organization. Good Luck!!! I have not received any employment opportunities since I have been honest stating the reason I was let go. On the application I state "Let go for a personal problem would, like to discuss". I always explain in the interview that "I was let go for a personal problem that affected my attendance. The problem is resolved, I am willing and ready to return to work. I am always told the position was given to a more qualified individual. I don't believe this response. I am continually told that a past employer cannot say I was fired. Is this true? Or can I say that there was a lay off? Please respond, Thanks You see, a non-decisive answer provides for others to think of Other important subjective things. This also provides time for you to evade a decision making reply,that gives away In-depth idea of your attitude. It is not so easy to be like that. A previous employer can say you were fired. However, They can't state anything more. like Why, when, what happened and so forth. I have not had any luck either with being honest. Getting fired sucks. Time heals I guess. Employers can provide any information that they are asked provided by applicable local or state law. You can provide whatever reason you feel necessary regarding the situation or reasons of why your employment ended, but if you allow the potential employer to contact your previous employers, you open the door for criticism and you could be caught in a lie, providing that you fasified the nature and reasoning of your employment and the circumstances on how it ended. The best resolve always that if you left an employer on uncertain or unresolved terms and for reasons that you don't really want to disclose, simply state that you left the employer to seek further career opportunities and advancement and decline if they ask that they can contact the previous employer. If you give permission for them to dig into your past employment, you are subject to the nature of your employment, and the actual information you provided, and if the don't match each other, the prospective employer is going to know you lied and is probably not going to hire you. And to the person who posted the answer stating they never get hired for being honest, from what I can gather from the information you provided is that you were fired from your job for an attendance/performance issue. If that is what you put on an application for a potential employer, of course you're not going to get hired, heck i wouldn't hire you. Employers are looking for dedicated, punctual, and honest people, not individuals who are terminated because the couldn't meet company attendance policies or performance standards. It is untrue that an employer can answer any information that they are asked. Confidentiality allows that unless a written release is signed by the former employee, the only information that can be provided regarding your employment is a confirmation that you were in fact employed there and whether termination was voluntary or involuntary. Without a release, they cannot provide any details on your termination even if asked. It is true that they can provide some details. They can see that you were an excellent employee or that you weren't that good. They won't lie. They cannot confirm or deny you were fired; however. If it is your most recent employer and within 2 years, the employer CAN give any information. If it is not within 2 years and isn't your most recent employment, the employer can only give dates of employment and whether or not the separation was voluntary or not. These laws may vary slightly state to state, but 9 out of 10 times this will hold true. If you are honest I am sure you will have at least 95% chance of getting the Job!
Asked in Job Search

Can you work at regal cinemas with a misdemeanor?

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Yes, but I wouldn't bring it up unless you are asked. It will come up if they ask you for a police check (which they probably will) but make sure to really sell yourself first and have a good explanation ready when asked about it.
Asked in Minnesota, Salary and Pay Rates, Job Search

What companies hire felons in Minnesota?

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Try Minnesota Wire and Cable, J & L Cable in St. Paul. Oil change places may be an option, except if the offence was car theft. Stryden Staffing in Edina places people in a job moving rentals from one car lot to the other. Stryden has looked at ex-offenders on a case-by-case basis, except for car theft offenses. 1st Choice Employment of White Bear Lake is an open-minded temporary and temp-to-permanent staffing company: 1stchoiceemploy.com They are particularly interested in CNC machinists, welders, and other skilled industrial workers. Also try Vision Staffing Solutions 763-428-2926. They don't have a blanket policy against ex-offenders. If you need to impress these case-by-case employers, show them that you have changed, that you won't reoffend, that you will be a safe and beneficial worker for their business."Joined: 12/08/2008 posted by HAPJobClub1 posted on Mon, 12/08/2008 - 17:27 "
Asked in Job Applications, Job Training and Career Qualifications, Job Search

How does a person with a felony record find a job?

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Answer Where you're at: If you are still under a supervised release program, then following the direction and assistance given by a parole officer is most prudent. At this stage, your primary goal is to complete your probation or parole, after which you may begin your new life. If you absolutely need cash, and cannot market your previous skills, then strongly consider a temp agency that will hire you out, and pay you, on a daily basis as a manual laborer. If you are already past the supervised release stage, then it's time to rebuild. Where you're not: Although it's disheartening, there are jobs you can't have pretty much without exception--exclude anything and everything that involves firearms, and explosives. Bonded positions, highly regulated and licensed positions, and most government jobs are off the prospective list as well. Positions working around minors are probably out too. Where you can go: You will most likely find your new career home in a small to very small company, where you will work closely with the owner. Most small companies struggle to survive, and rely heavily on each employee they have. You will probably be working with or near the owner, because they are down working in the trenches to keep their company afloat on a daily basis. Where you can't go: Most medium to large companies don't want to be involved with any real or perceived liability in hiring you. If this is the route you really want to pursue, than plan on adding a lot of positive factors to your resume between the time of your conviction and the time you apply. Do not lie on the application since you will be fired if they discover the lie. What you can do: Unskilled and semi-skilled labor positions are high on a convicts new job list, as most employers need to keep these revolving door type jobs filled. Residential construction labor is a good starter job. You can build your skill level, increase your wages, and maybe find a long-term home with a contractor. Assume you will have to discuss your conviction, and that a background investigation will be done. Employers want to know that you have moved-on from your experience. A simple statement is all that's needed. "I was convicted of -xxx- , and have fulfilled my obligations to the Court/Society/etc. I know that crime is wrong, and I also know that I have to try harder, and be better than the average person. I am ready to do this." (Don't go into a tirade about how life has done you wrong, or that you're a victim etc. The above statement is clear, concise, and should be accurate.) What else can you do: You will now need to prove that you are in fact trying harder. Education is a must: If you need a GED, get one. Enroll in Community College classes (education) and courses (skills). If you have a skill or specific education, consider teaching Adult Education classes. Use counselors to help develop a new career path. Volunteer for Community Service. It looks good on a resume, it puts you in a networking position, it exposes you to potential employers, it keeps you away from an unsavory crowd, and it should make you feel better about yourself. Two full days (or the equivalent) per month is the norm. Use peer support to explore new career options. Consider church. It has the same exposure as Volunteering, and can be a source of support for some. Use church leaders for career guidance and support. Try to expunge your conviction, or apply for a Certificate of Rehabilitation (or the equivalent.) All felony convictions can be made to go away; Some are just harder than others (such as Federal convictions requiring a Pardon or Clemency, or Registrant Crimes which may require continued registration.) Prevent future convictions. This is a no-brainer, but still needs to be said. You have been given (a sort of) second chance. You have fairly permanent legal handicap. Try to earn what you need to live comfortably, but look for success outside of monetary achievement. This is all I can offer. Many communities have people who work as an Employment Specialist who have connections to employers and job positions that allow felonies/work release. A good place to register and check in with is your local Workforce office, or a city office that helps with employment. When you call, ask specifically about anyone who works directly with felons, people with backgrounds, or any other barrier you might face (language, Veteran status, etc.). Goodwill is also normally a good contact, or may be able to give you the name of someone who can help. Other places where I have had luck finding people employment (I am an Employment Specialist working with felons)are temp or temp-to-hire agencies that primarily hire for production and warehouse work. This day labor, while not your dream job, will provide money for survival while you find THE job. Answer No one solution: Here, in Delaware, there are no community release people to talk to, nor will the parole officer try to assist you. In some ways this is for your benefit, as this motivates you to find alternate solutions. But when you have a number of restrictions that prevent you from doing normal job hunting (such as restricted to home, not able to drive, must have supervision, et al.) then things get complicated. Here are some of the things I have learned: 1. DO NOT APPLY WITH PLACEMENT AGENCIES! These people have no mercy with you. You will not bring them any money and as such do not want to deal with you. Some even trade information between themselves and say "this is a bad person". They are under no obligation to remove old data on you after a period of time. Save them for the far future after you get a few years of work under your belt. 2. Apply direct. Use sites such as Careerbuilder.com and others to e-mail your resume to places where they are hiring. But be careful, many of these so call "We have a job open...." are really placement firms wanting to contract you out or sell you to the companies you normally would work for. Always check the name of the company and throw that into a search engine to see if you can get to their own site and avoid the middle man. 2.a Apply to state and federal agencies. They have to hire you if you qualify. Your conviction should not count against you unless you are forbidden to work in a area that would violate law, or prevent you from getting a security clearance. (Hit the latter with one company myself) 3. Check the local news papers online. Check the local papers and click the classified sections. Most will allow to you get to them for free, or you can read the paper at the library. Some say you have to pay to read the paper, but the classified section may be free. Check around. 4. Check online state run job sites. Some like www.delawareonline.com actually uses careerbuilder.com for their engine. So it does not do you any good there. It is also noted that a number of states are using third party engines. If you use the state entry point that may get you into the engine better than trying to go into the job search site directly. 5. Yellow Pages Baby! - get the names and addresses of companies that you think would have jobs like the one you do. Send letters to them. "Cold Call" is the term. However, if you are like me, you cannot afford a $41.00 for 100 stamps, plus paper, plus envelopes, plus $20 or $40 ink for your printer (times 3 to 5 depending on your printer)...plus...plus...plus... but it is a good method to get the information directly to the people. 6. NETWORK! Get a hold of your pastor, friend, relative, anyone that could put in a good word for you. Even if you don't know someone, make a flyer and ask if you can put it up in church, or up in a place where you find other fliers. If you have the money, put a ad in the paper. 7. TIME - You did time, now time is something that you have to face. The more jobs you apply for the more likely you will be to find one. Every Monday, try to find five good, likely jobs and apply. Then, keep looking. I hunt over 8 hours a day. I surf the job sites constantly. I visit company web sites and look for "Employment" or "Careers" at the bottom or top of the web pages (most are very small print with colors that are hard to find) and type my butt off in having to deal with all the variety and myriad ways of applying online. (Visit walmart.com and try their system - be sure to have a wrist brace and Motrin for when you are done...) While you are doing all of these things, get your free credit report. Ex-Cons are the targets of identity theft. People figure you won't need your ID for a few years so.... Get the credit report and see what's there. You can be sure that most employers will run a background check on you these days. If you show up as someone else they may not hire you. Banks will most certainly do one on you. When they see that your last address was prison, then they will be very reluctant to give you an account other than "restricted", or give you an ATM or Debit card. (but that's for another WIKI) For second ID's get one from the library, or take one (1) class from a college in the area. (Can you say Pell Grants?) Answer I have had this problem. I tried different ways to approach this: 1. I applied only with small businesses that are more open-minded and are willing to hire people despite past mistakes. 2. I became an Independent Contractor in the retail field. As such I was contracted out through various companies (most of which do not do a background check, and seem to not even care about your record as long as you can get the contracts done). There is a lot of money that can be made by someone willing to work, travel, or live in a metro area. 3. I am now involved in my family business, where everyone here knows, supports and doesn't care about my felonies. I to have seen this being a problem and going back to school was not the answer either. So I have started my own home base business it looks to me that may be the only answer for us that have made a mistake in our lives. I am beginning to think we need to ban together on this area of our lives. would like to offer what I am doing to others it would be great for all of us Answer Starting your own business or working for a small business owner who is willing to take a risk are best. Many, many large companies won't hire someone with a felony. Good Luck. Your best bet is word of mouth or under the table. Even though by law the majority of businesses are not allowed to turn you away because you are an ex-con. They will. Obviously they aren't going to come right out and say that's why they didn't hire you, but it probably is. Try going to a temp agency that hires day labor. Make sure you don't lie about your criminal background. Let them find a job for you. Answer In Michigan, start with your local CAP agencies...(Community Action Program) They are non-profit and usually have an employment specialist to assist you in finding employment. There is no straight forward answer to this question. You just have to keep looking and try real hard to find a job here in Florida! Even though a lot of places run background checks, not all of them actually do! It may not provide the pay that an individual needs to survive, but there are entry level positions available in every state. Proving one's self is a part of the process. Answer The answer is to call employment temporary agencies that have a listing of some employers that do hire some convicted felons depending on their background relation to the felony charge. I wish everyone good luck in trying to contribute to society in a positive way and I pray that your search is a successful one. Answer I have a family member who is a convicted felon. I have to say that he did a lot of growing up while in jail. This family member, because he was a convicted felon could not work in the health field. What I would do is if you are on probation ask your probation officer what kind of jobs that you can apply for. I would not judge anyone because of their past. You can always start on low of the ladder, but you can always work your way up!
Asked in Job Interviews, Job Applications, Job Search

How do you answer 'Reason for leaving last job' on a job application?

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Just be honest. For instance, you might say there was "No Career Opportunity". That's usually the best answer, especially if you quit. It's honest, truthful, and you don't have to explain everything in detail. If your employment was a contract, just put, "End of Contract." If you were laid off, you could put, "Laid Off." If you don't think it matters, then "No Career Oppourtunity" will suffice. "Idle job, I like challenges!" "I am looking for better prospects and a better work environment."
Asked in Job Interviews, Job Search, Engineering

What kind of questions should you ask when being interviewed for a call center position?

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1.I would like to know the company's standard norms. (when asked how much salary do you expect?). 2. Is it take-home salary or are there any deductions in it?( when they tell the amount). 3. what are the benefits I get along with the salary? 4. Is transportation charges, break fast and lunch coupons too deducted in the salary? Further. Hours of work, days of work, break and lunch times, paid how often, and by what method, cheque to you, or direct bank deposit. Who do I report to, and how often do I report, and in what manner, verbally, or in written form.
Asked in Salary and Pay Rates, Computers, Job Search, Job Descriptions

What does it mean 'enter your desired job title'?

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It simply means what your looking to be for ex. Cashier Most companies use standard job application forms so they just need you to identify the role you wish to apply for. Sometimes there is a job reference number too which will appear in the job advertisement and it is important to quote this in your covering letter and on the application form if it is required.
Asked in Jobs & Education, Job Search

How do you ask a friend for a job?

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Just open your mouth and ASK. ^^^^^^ that or just explain that youve had trouble finding a job lately and that he could really help you out and do you a favor .... Its not easy but its your friends so he should understand
Asked in Jobs, Job Search, Job Descriptions

Is quitting your job over the phone good or bad?

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It is considered good practice to give a written two-week notice or letter of resignation in person. In many cases, failing to do so will put you on a do not hire list and you will not be eligible for re-hire. This may also mean that you would not get a good reference from the company. It is always best not to burn bridges, so to speak. You may think that you wouldn't want to return to your job but may later realize that you need to do so. To be put on a do not hire list is not good for your career. If you must quit over the phone due to circumstances, I would suggest stating that the circumstances are the reason why and that you will follow up with a letter of resignation in person, if possible.
Asked in Job Training and Career Qualifications, Job Search, Bachelor of Science BSc, Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)

What kind of jobs can you get with a bachelor's degree in business management or administration?

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A lot would depend on the prestige of the school you graduated from and your specialty. In general, a B.A. in Business Administration would be helpful to getting a position in a range of administrative jobs, from office management, administrative assistant, financial administration, HR, entry-level sales or marketing positions, etc. Business is one of the most flexible majors. Most B.A. in Business Admin degrees have a focus area (e.g., entrepreneurship, economics, communications, accounting, marketing, etc.) that would be helpful in preparing you for certain types of jobs. There are many, many jobs that a person with a bachelor's degree in bus. mgmt or admin can be qualified to do. This is partially because both of those degrees are very broad based. Check with a local college's career center to see if they can give you a list from one of their software programs (ie DISCOVER, SIGI Plus) of all of the possible occupations. The most important things are good interview skills and a great cover letter/resume/thank you letter. A student who earns a bachelor degree in business management or business administration has a vast range of jobs to choose from. With a business management degree, he can choose from jobs like office management which can include sales manager, purchasing manager, marketing manager, operations manager, account manager, financial manager, etc. The kind of jobs you will get also depends on what you have specialized in. With a business administration degree, you can get jobs as an administrative executive, HR manager, office administrator, business developer, etc. As these degrees cover a wide range of subjects, there is no limit to the kind of jobs a person holding any of these degrees can get.
Asked in Job Search, Home-Based Businesses, Online Jobs

Who are Home Employment Agency and are they legit?

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Before you sign up, you might want to read, online, possible scam reviews of the home employment agency. If you're interested in earning money from home, do not bother with things like scam sites. Look for websites, to check for finding legitimate home jobs, where there is no charge and everything is free.
Asked in Job Search

What is a job board aggregator?

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Job aggregator is basically a search engine that collects job listings in large numbers from different job portals and job boards and post to the site. Meaning, the potential job seekers can find all the vital information related to a job at just one place without scrolling from one site to another. It becomes easy and quick for the job seekers to find the multiple job ads at one place. It is basically a one stop place for all job requirements. Learn More - propellum.com
Asked in Math and Arithmetic, Resume Writing, Job Search, Microsoft Word

Is there a font larger than 72 in Word 2003?

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yes it can go up to 1638, you just need to highlight the number in the font size box and type in any font size you want.
Asked in Job Search, US Army, US Marine Corps

How do you conduct a job search in a different state?

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Here are more opinions and friendus from other Wiki s Contributors: There are numerous on-line job search sites. This would be a good first effort. Next, go out on one of the search engines and type in the city and the words local newspapers - check out their classifieds or job sections on-line. Then find local chambers of commerce and contact them with a resume and a brief letter on what your occupation is and your desire to relocate. Next think about moving at your own expense - employers like to save the cost of relocation if at all possible. Another excellent source of out of town job leads are the fraternal organizations, national occupational organizations and the religious affiliations. Contact them for regional job help as well. Also check out 'local' job web sites that focus specifically on jobs in specific cities/counties. Sometimes employers will advertise jobs on "smaller" job sites in an effort to get candidates from their local geography, instead of putting the job in a national search database such as Monster. You can find these sites by searching through Google, Yahoo, etc or use a career site has a list of local resources for a lot of areas in the country. Um, speaking from experience, it's really hard. Employers quickly notice that you have an out-of-state number and address, and they usually trash your CV unless you're like a doctor, engineer, etc. If you're just a regular person who has a regular job, you may need to wait until you arrive in town to mount any type of serious search. Getting a cell phone number in your prospective search area, a local PO Box (or using a friend or relatives address), and using a national email service may soften the difficulty you are likely to find in finding a job out of area. (Some may see the list of out-of-area employers and just assume before taking to you that you are someone who's coming home after being away for a while.) You could also try some temp agencies. A lot of temp agencies have online applications now. You could also try something outside of the box bizmediaone.com may be able to help you.
Asked in Business & Finance, Salary and Pay Rates, Job Search

What are the top 5 worries you have when starting a job?

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#1) Stress, #2) Being Fired, #3) Not being accepted as a good worker, #4) Falling behind in your work, and #5) Getting off to a bad start with other employees.
Asked in Jobs, Resume Writing, Job Search

How do you follow up when a job ad says 'please no phone calls' and does not include a contact name?

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you do not go for that job then... that is THEIR loss. not yours....... -its their fault... You can send them email if e mail is given or you can visit the company's website and send your resume in career option to HR department
Asked in Job Search, Doctors

What are the best locum tenens companies and why?

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The best locum tenens company is the one that works best for you. It can depend on the specialty that you are in as to which one is a better fit for you. There are some questions that you will want to ask when you begin working with a locum company. 1.) Make sure they know what you are looking for; specialty, location, schedule, length of contract. 2.) Make sure you understand what expenses the locum company is going to be responsible for if you are traveling for the assignment and what expenses you will be responsible for. 3.) When you have been accepted for an assignment, you should be allowed to speak to a physicians that are currently there or have done locum assignments there.
Asked in Job Training and Career Qualifications, Math and Arithmetic, Job Search

How does math involve in being an oceanographer?

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You would use many algebraic and geometric equations to study and survey heights of ocean mountains, depths of ocean crevasses, and the amount of land mass in a given area.
Asked in Job Interviews, Job Applications, Job Search

How do you answer 'What did you think of your last boss' in a job interview?

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Here's what the resume advice company Resume Edge recommends as a sample answer to the question, "What do you think of your previous manager?" My previous manager had excellent technical skills and was very agreeable as a colleague. I would have liked more support from her at times, but her hands-off style meant that I had to become resourceful in problem solving and negotiating with colleagues. Click here for more of their advice on tough interview questions. This is a trick question. Anyone who would say bad things about their previous boss might say bad things about their next boss. If you have a truthful positive answer about your previous boss, say so. If you have a truthful negative answer about your previous boss, either decline to answer, or divert the question to talking about what was unfulfilling about the job. Always give fact-based friendus, never opinions. He/She was ver kind personality, positive thinker/ very professional and understandable.
Asked in Job Interviews, Job Applications, Job Search

Is it a good idea to keep calling if you haven't been formally rejected and the job is still open?

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I think that you should all be given the opportunity to have what you want to do in life.
Asked in Job Search, Parole and Conditional Release

What jobs will hire felons?

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This varies dramatically state to state, and even city to city.