International Space Station

The International Space Station (or ISS) is a Space Station jointly being constructed by NASA and the Russian Space Agency, along with Canada, Japan, Brazil, and the ESA, in an effort to send astronauts into space for long durations and conduct experiments in space. Construction began in 1998 and is scheduled to be completed in 2011. Our International Space Station category is for questions related to the International Space Station and its operations.

Asked in Astronomy, International Space Station

Can you see Skylab on Nov 7?

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Skylab was deorbited and crashed into the Australian Outback long ago. Perhaps you mean the International Space Station? Very possibly, depending on your location. Go to spaceweather.com, and click the "Satellite Flybys" link. Enter your location, and the site will calculate when you might be able to see the ISS. It's a beautiful sight; I've seen it dozens of times. It's bright, and FAST.
Asked in Astronomy, Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Space Travel and Exploration

How long does it take to get to the ISS?

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According to NASA’s website and a video produced in 2013, it takes about 3 days from initial launch to reach the International Space Station. However, that same year, a Russian Soyuz vessel made the journey in under 6 hours.
Asked in International Space Station, Astronauts

How do astronauts get water on the space station?

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They take the water with them. they will have to reuse it a well.
Asked in International Space Station, Astronauts, NASA

What is the difference between orbital and suborbital space flights?

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An Orbital space flight simply means that you have accelerated a space craft fast enough so it stays in orbit (cicular path) around the Earth. A suborbital flight means you have reached the limit of space (anything over 100 km high) but not enough speed to completely circle the Earth.
Asked in International Space Station

What are the disadvantages for international space station?

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Probably the only disadvantage is the high maintenance cost but its really worth the research conducted.
Asked in Train Travel, International Space Station, London

How long does it take to get to continental Europe by train from international station?

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London to Brussels takes around 2 hours and London to Paris about 2 hours 30 minutes. If you need to travel beyond these two destinations, you will have to change trains.
Asked in International Space Station

What time can you see the space station from earth today?

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It depends on your location. Check on the Internet for specific times at your latitude and longitude. There are some nice iPhone apps that will give you a list for your location.
Asked in International Space Station

What does ISS stand for?

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Internashinal space station
Asked in International Space Station, NASA

What equipment does the international space station carry?

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The ISS carries MANY different kinds of equipment from plants, to space food, experiental equipment, spae suits, and they even have a cumputer that tells ET'S what planet we are from, what animals live on earth , currency, country's, and how humans reproduce.
Asked by Henry Feeney in Physics, International Space Station, Space

What happens when you boil water in space?

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In microgravity environments, boiling works very differently than it does on Earth. Under our gravity conditions, hotter parts of the liquid rise, while cooler parts sink. When vapor bubbles begin to form, they get shot upward, creating that classic "rolling boil." In space, though, heated liquid doesn't rise, so it just sits next to the heater and gets hotter. Likewise, as bubbles of vapor form, they don't rise to the surface. Instead, they form one big bubble that moves through the liquid. Sometimes, that big bubble sticks to the heat source, preventing the rest of the liquid from boiling. Other times, the liquid doesn't boil at all. Astronauts aboard the International Space Station have gotten liquids up to 160 degrees Kelvin above their normal boiling temperatures, and since "superheating" a liquid like that can be dangerous, they couldn't heat it any more than that for safety reasons. All that's to say that microgravity makes hot liquids behave weirdly, and scientists don't have it all figured out.
Asked in International Space Station, Physics, Space Shuttle

How does the international space station travel?

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The International Space Station is constantly circling the earth. It is in a state of freefall, meaning that it is literally "Falling" around the earth. Since the station falls at an angle relative to the ground, it will stay on a constant circular path around the earth, until some other force alters its path.
Asked in International Space Station

Has the ISS been hit by a meteor?

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Nothing bigger than a grain of dust, so far. However, the astronauts do have emergency precautions they can take if it were to happen.
Asked in Math and Arithmetic, Volume, International Space Station

How many cubic feet in the International Space Station?

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The ISS will have an internal pressurized volume of 46,000 cubic feet, or about 1.5 Boeing 747s. (from a Boeing website of ISS funfacts)
Asked in International Space Station, Asteroids

How do space stations avoid being hit by asteroids?

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The space station is really never at risk from Asteroids. An asteroid is like a small planet in size, so if by small chance one ever came close to Earth, we would probably all be doomed. However there is all kinds of space debris that the space station must be protected from. The most common threat is from micro meteorites. These are small particles of space rock that are usually only a few grams in size. It is impossible to avoid them, so spacecraft are designed to survive impacts. There are larger, more dangerous types of debris too, such as broken satellites, lost equipment, or even rocket boosters. The U.S. Strategic Command keeps a catalogue of over 19,000 pieces of space debris 10 cm in diameter and larger. If the space station ever gets too close, it will fire rocket engines to avoid the debris.
Asked in Social Sciences, International Space Station, Doctors

Which country has the most intelligent people?

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1. India 2. Germany 3. USA 4. Japan (Technology and Engineering) 5. Philippines (Language and Mathematics and in corruption) 6. Spain 7. Singapore (business) 8. China 9. Canada 10. Russia
Asked in International Space Station, Space Shuttle, Astronauts

Why does an astronaut in an orbiting spacecraft float?

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It is a popular misconception that there is no gravity in space. In fact, the gravitational pull on astronauts in the International Space Station (ISS) is nearly the full amount (about 90%) of the gravitational pull on the surface of the earth. While in orbit around the earth, the ISS is free falling, and everything inside the ISS is also free falling. In true free fall you feel weightless, but there is still gravity that is causing you to fall. . Imagine you are in an elevator and the cables snap, and the elevator starts falling. Disregarding air friction, you and everyone in the elevator will all fall at the same speed as the elevator. You will be able to "float" weightlessly inside the elevator, just as astronauts do inside the ISS. . In the case of the elevator, we know eventually you will meet an untimely end when the elevator strikes the ground floor. But unlike the elevator, the ISS is also moving sideways at a very high speed, so as it falls downward, it also travels sideways, and so the ISS follows the path of a circle. The shape and size of this circle is such that the ISS never gets any closer to the earth, even though it is "falling". The ISS is free falling in an orbital path. . To understand how the ISS is free falling, follow this mental experiment. Disregard air friction, and assume you have unlimited strength. Imagine throwing a baseball level to the ground - that is, you don't throw it up or down, but it is travelling parallel to the ground when it leaves your hand. We all know from experience the ball will travel a ways before falling to the ground. Now, throw it twice as hard. It will travel twice as far before hitting the ground. Now imagine being able to throw the baseball so hard that it lands 6000 miles (10,000 Km) away. But 6000 miles away is a quarter of the way around the spherical planet. So your ball did not go in a straight line - it was falling all the time it was in flight, but because the earth was curving away, the ball also travelled in a curved line while in free fell. Finally, imagine throwing the ball so hard that, as it fell downwards, the earth curved away at the same rate, and so the ball whizzed around the earth and hit you on the back of the head. . We know that a ball cannot hit you on the back of the head, even if you could throw it that hard, because of air friction and obstacles in the way, like mountains. But at 250 miles up, there is (almost) no air friction, and no obstacles to prevent the ball from circling the earth. That is exactly what happens to the ISS - the rockets push (throw) the ISS so hard and so fast in a sideways direction that, as the ISS falls, the earth curves away from it at exactly the same rate, and so the ISS really does fall without actually getting closer to the earth. . That is why when they make movies (like Apollo 13, directed by Ron Howard), they were able to duplicate true weightlessness. They put the actors in a set inside an jet airplane, and flew the airplane high up, cut the engines, and allowed the airplane, and everyone in it, to free fall for a while. During the airplane's free fall, everyone was weightless, exactly as if they were on the ISS. . Indeed, we know from Newton's first law of motion that a body in motion moves at the same speed and in the same direction unless a force acts upon it. So we know that the ISS would go in a straight line, NOT in orbit, if no forces were acting upon it. But it does follow a circular orbit, and so we know for certain that that full force of gravity is still acting upon the ISS and all of its occupants.
Asked in Space Travel and Exploration, Space Shuttle, Planet Mercury, International Space Station

How long does it take for the International Space Station to orbit Earth?

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==Orbital period== The International Space Station completes 15.79 orbits per day, or about one orbit every 90 minutes.
Asked in International Space Station

What equipment does a space station carry?

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it could carry anything like computers, space suits, tools, etc.
Asked in International Space Station

What is the distance between Earth and the International Space Station?

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On average, the ISS (International Space Station), is about 199 to 215 miles above the surface of the Earth.
Asked in International Space Station

How far away is the Mir space station from earth?

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0 feet It was de-orbited years ago! Bottom of the sea!
Asked in War and Military History, Airplanes and Aircraft, International Space Station, NASA

What were early rockets made from?

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The earliest rockets were made from black powder. The Chinese invented black powder and used them in simple rockets like you would buy today to celebrate the Fourth of July. The loose black powder was packed into rolled paper and a fuse was inserted that is made from paper and black powder. Later, rockets were made by forming black powder into a paste and molding it as a solid into a rocket chamber. This requires a little more skill and is very dangerous operation.
Asked in Astronomy, International Space Station, The Moon

How long will it take someone on the space station to get to the moon?

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They will not get to the moon because the space station is not going that way! The distance covered by an object in space is related not only to its speed but its direction and also how these are affected by the gravitational pull of nearby objects. So looking simply at the orbital speed of the space station is totally useless in answering the question.