English to Latin

Translating English words into Latin. How you say and spell English language words and phrases in the Latin language.

Asked in Definitions, Latin to English, English to Latin

What is declension?

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Declension organizes the non-verbal parts of speech so as to indicate case endings gender, and number. Case endings help relate the different parts of speech to the verb, and to the rest of the sentence. In the specific example of Latin, the cases are called as follows: nominative, for the subject of the sentence; genitive, to show possession; dative, for the indirect object; accusative, for the direct object; and ablative, for objects of prepositions. Gender indicates whether an object or person is feminine, masculine, or neuter. And number indicates whether the object or person is singular, in the case of one; or plural, in the case of more than one. In contrast to Latin, declension isn't strong in English. There are traces of its influence in the differentiation between singular and plural. There are even fewer traces in the differentiaton between cases. Nowadays, it tends to exist in the pronoun forms of he/him/his, I/me/mine, she/her/hers, they/them/their/theirs, and we/us/our/ours. And there are even rare sightings of gender, other than examples such as blond and blonde.
Asked in English to Latin

What is the Latin Syndicate?

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Latin syndicate is small infamous Miami based gang also referred to as 12 19 colors are black and grey
Asked in The Bible, English to Latin

Latin translation for Devil or Lucifer?

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Lucifer comes from the Latin words, lucem ferre, which mean "light-bearer", a name for the dawn appearance of the planet Venus which was to be seen as daylight approached. The origin of the name can be found in Isaiah chapter 14, which talks of the pomp and splendour of the king of Babylon, who had ruled the nations in anger, and his fate after his overthrow by the king of Persia. He had compared himself to the morning star (and was thus derisorily called 'Lucifer') and had thought that he would ascend into heaven and sit among the stars, but was now himself persecuted. He has become weak and like one of us; he will go to hell. This passage was misunderstood by Christian translators, resulting in the widespread Christian view that Lucifer and the devil are one. The Latin word for devil is diabolus.
Asked in Latin to English, English to Latin

What is the meaning of latin word Omnia?

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Omnis means "every" or "all". As it only appears with the 'a' ending in the neuter plural, we can take this usually as a substantive for "all things" or, more commonly, "everything".
Asked in Latin to English, Famous Quotations, English to Latin

What does carpe diem vita brevis mean?

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There are two phrases here: carpe diem, meaning "seize the day"; and vita brevis, meaning "short life."
Asked in Roman Numerals, English to Latin

What is the latin word for Roman take-out restaurant and bar?

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The roman equivalent of a takeout joint was the thermpolia. However, it was not a restaurant or bar. It was a bakery. The Romans did not have restaurants. The word was Greek and meant "a place where (something) hot is sold." It sold ready to eat food and it has been considered the forerunner of restaurants and the food they served had been compared to today's fast food. It served the poor who did not have a private kitchen. It had a counter at the front with recesses for heat efficient containers. Many had dining areas at the back. However, most people eat their food on benches along the sidewalk. Most Romans lived on the upper floors of the insulae (apartment blocks four to seven floors high) which had small and overcrowded rooms with no running water, cooking facility or toilets. People went there only to sleep and lived outdoors. They went to outdoors public toilets and to the public baths and eat outdoors. Bread and other grain based foods were all that the poor could afford. Therefore, the bakeries were the places where the food they ate was made and sold. The bakeries were extremely busy and, due to the masses of customers, people ate siting on outdoors benches. The thermopoliae were scorned by the upper classes who had a kitchen in their domus (detached house). Nowadays the word tavern is usually used in reference to the ancient Roman bars. However, the use of the word tavern for a drinking place is more recent. In ancent Rome a taberna (plural tabernae) was a shop. There was also the taberna diversoria, or simply diversorium, but these were inns along the Roman Roads. The Romans had wine bars called popina (plural popinae). This served wine and simple foods such as olives, bread and stew. They were frequented by plebeians, slaves, freedmen and foreigners. They were simple places and had stools and tables. There was no eating reclined here. This was an aristocratic custom. In the literature (which was written by aristocrats) the popina was described as a place of immoral and illicit behaviour, crime and violence. There were attempts to curb the popinae. Tiberius forbade the sale of cooked food. Claudius ordered their closing down, but this failed. Nero ordered that only some kinds of vegetables and pulses could be sold. Vespasian issued a similar edict. There was gambling with dice at the popinae, even though it was illegal. Abundant archaeological finds of dices confirm this. The popinea were also seen as brothels. However, they did not have separate rooms for sex. Prostitutes went there to pick up punters and took them elsewhere. There was also the cauponia which, according to one source, differed from the popina in that it offered overnight accommodation.
Asked in English to Latin, Translations

How do you spell sixty in different languages?

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Sixty in Dutch is zestig, in French it is soixante, in German it it sechzig, in Italian it is sessanta, in Portuguese it is sessenta, and in Spanish it is sesenta. Source: http://babelfish.yahoo.com/translate_txt And we say 'hatvan' in Hungary. It's also a name of a city here.
Asked in English to Latin

What is the Latin translation for wanderer?

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There isnt an exact word but a close word would be "incola", meaning inhabitant. Another is "peregrinum" meaning pilgrim or wanderer.
Asked in Latin to English, English to Latin

What is latin phrase for 'i came i saw i lost'?

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veni vidi perdidi is I came, I saw, I lost(something) but you probably mean veni vidi defui (I came, I saw, I failed)
Asked in Latin to English, English to Latin

What does magister disciplus auxilium et magnum beneficium in schola dedit mean in Latin?

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The schoolmaster gave help and great benefit to the student in school. Note: In your sentence, 'discipulus' should have been translated to 'discipulō', "to the student," as putting the word in the dative case is the only way it would make sense. I was only able to translate the sentence after changing the original word from a nominative to a dative.
Asked in English to Latin

What does Esto Castos mean in latin?

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esto castus means "Be good!" addressed to a single male person.
Asked in Latin to English, English to Latin

What does non sedent mean in Latin?

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It means: They are not sitting; They do not sit.
Asked in Translations, Latin to English, English to Latin, Slogans and Mottos

How do you say goodbye in Latin?

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Best Latin term for 'goodbye' was 'vale' (to one person) or 'Valete' (to more than one'.
Asked in English to Latin

How do you say 'music soothes the soul' in Latin?

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Musica animum mulcet. Musica spiritum mulcet. 'Animus' translates more as you will / character. 'spiritus' translates as more of a 'breath' sort of concept of the soul.
Asked in English to Latin

How do you say strength through knowledge in latin?

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Per Scientiam Vires Correct Translation is Fortitudo per Scientiam
Asked in English to Latin, Latin to English

What is viti in Latin?

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The Latin root viti-, as in "viticulture", means "grape vine". As an independent word in Latin, viti is either the dative of vitis, "grape vine", to be translated "to/for the grapevine" the genitive of vitium, "vice; fault", to be translated "of vice"