Coins and Paper Money

Please include as many of these criteria as possible in your question to ensure an accurate evaluation of a coin: the denomination, the country of origin, the year of minting and the condition.

Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Coins

What is a double headed nickel worth?

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This is NOT something that was done at the Mint. It's a privately made novelty item, known as a Magician's Coin, created by altering two normal coins and joining the pieces back together. Use a magnifier to check just inside the rim on one side of the coin -- you are looking for the seam where the two pieces were joined -- it could be on either side of the coin. They cost about $7-8 new from novelty shops and sell for $2-3 on eBay. They have no value to coin collectors, however, because they are privately made by damaging genuine coins. You can hold onto it for magic tricks and making bets.... but be prepared to run fast if you use it for a bet. More Many years ago the Mint had all coin presses redesigned so that dies are "keyed". That is, obverse dies only fit into the obverse anvil and reverse dies fit into the reverse anvil. It's physically impossible for two same-side dies to be put into a press. While many errors including "mule" coins (half one denomination, half another) can still occur, double-headed coins are not and cannot number among those mistakes. See the related Web Links for more info. Dan Moore The Working Man's Rare Coins Answer More info : Its amazing how many of these are turning up on this board. Follow the links to the previous questions. Yours is just like all the others. You can use the Search feature of this site to find many, many similar questions about how these novelty "coins" are made.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Coins

What is the value of a 1974 Kennedy half dollar?

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Any U.S. half dollars dated 1971 and found in circulation are only worth 50 cents. They're made of copper-nickel like dimes and quarters, not silver, and have no special value. Circulation Kennedy halves have been struck at Philadelphia and Denver. Philadelphia halves only started to use the P mint mark in 1980, so a 1974 50¢ without a mint mark is perfectly normal. Denver halves dated 1968 and later have a small D between the date and the bottom of JFK's portrait. A dealer would probably charge $1-2 for one in uncirculated condition. If it's a proof coin with an S mint mark and in its original package, $2-3. "E Pluribus Unum", "Liberty" ALL U.S. coins carry these mottos so they really don't helping to ID a specific coin.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, Credit Reports

What animal is on a 5c coin?

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There are multiple animals on 5 cent coins depending on the country and time period such as the Buffalo on the US "buffalo nickel", the Beaver on the Canadian nickel, etc.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Coins, Franklin Mint

What is the value of a 1922 dollar coin?

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Right now it is worth about $25 just for the silver it contains. If it shows any significant wear, that's about all you can get for it, but in the highest grades it can be worth several hundred if it has no mint mark or a 'D' mint mark and possibly $2500 or more with an 'S' mintmark. If you have a large (38 mm) silver dollar, 1922 is the most common date for Peace Dollars. The mint mark in on the tail side below the word ONE. The number of coins minted for your coin year is 51,737,000. PLEASE do not polish it. This will reduce the value greatly. The value of a 1922 Peace Dollar is based upon the fact of the "Relief", which is the extent to which the image on the coin is raised above the background. A Normal relief coin (the most common variety) will be priced between $17.00 and $175.00 according to wear. A mint state or proof coin can bring as much as $60,000.00. A high relief coin that shows little wear will appraise at $2,500.00 while a near perfect condition specimen will be at $50,000.00-$75,000.00. Remember that this is for a "High Relief" Peace Dollar. Check the related link below called "Price Guide" to see the current value. If you have a small gold dollar, it is a commemorative Grant Memorial Dollar. There are varieties with and without a star over Grant's name which makes a difference in the price for some grades. Even if it shows a bit of wear, it is listed at $1500. $1800 if uncirculated, and if certified as MS-65. In MS-67, with the star it lists at $5500 and without it at $8000. In God We Trvst Many people wonder about the "Trvst" spelling on the motto. TRVST is the normal spelling for all Peace Dollars (as well as other coins from that time period). It is NOT an error. The use of V for U was an affectation of the time period, when designers were very fond of old Roman styles. The Latin alphabet did not have a separate letter for U; V served as a consonant, vowel, AND a number (!) You had to tell the uses apart by context. The say was true for the letter I, which also served as the consonant that we call J. The letters U and J were not commonly used until the Middle Ages.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, John F. Kennedy, US Coins

What is a double headed half dollar worth?

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Answer This is NOT something that was done at the Mint. It's a privately made novelty item, known as a Magician's Coin, created by altering two normal coins and joining the pieces back together. Use a magnifier to check just inside the rim on one side of the coin -- you are looking for the seam where the two pieces were joined -- it could be on either side of the coin. They cost about $7-8 new from novelty shops and sell for $2-3 on eBay. They have no value to coin collectors, however, because they are privately made by damaging genuine coins. The only possible good news is that if you have an older magician's half dollar made before 1965, it would have enough silver in it that you could probably sell it to a scrap dealer for around $5 or $6. The other thing you could do is hold onto it for magic tricks and making bets.... but be prepared to run fast if you use it for a bet. More Many years ago the Mint had all coin presses redesigned so that dies are "keyed". That is, obverse dies only fit into the obverse anvil and reverse dies fit into the reverse anvil. It's physically impossible for two same-side dies to be put into a press. While many errors including "mule" coins (half one denomination, half another) can still occur, double-headed coins are not and cannot number among those mistakes. See the related Web Links for more info. Dan Moore The Working Man's Rare Coins http:/www.workingmancoins.com Answer More info : Its amazing how many of these are turning up on this board. Follow the links to the previous questions. Yours is just like all the others. Answer You have a manually altered novelty item, known as a Magician's Coin, made by altering two normal coins and gluing the pieces back together, that sells regularly for a couple dollars. Use a magnifier and examine just inside the raised rim on both sides of the coin, looking for a seam where the pieces are joined, that can be on either side of the coin.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, European Coins

How much is a 1911 French 10 Franc coin worth?

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The 1911 10 Franc from France is a gold coin worth about 150-200 US dollars, and there is a Swiss 10 Franc coin, too, also worth 150-200.
Asked in Math and Arithmetic, Coins and Paper Money

How many dimes are in 8590?

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The answer to this question is 859 dimes!
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Coins

How much is a 1910 gold 5 dollar coin?

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Assuming the coin is circulated and has no mintmark, the 1910 Indian Head Half Eagle is considered common. For an accurate assessment of value the coin needs to be seen and graded. In general retail values for low grade coins are $456.00-$468.00, better grade are $480.00-$486.00 and coins showing almost no wear run from $490.00-$520.00. Values are a market average and only for coins in collectible condition, coins that are bent, corroded, scratched, used as jewelry or have been cleaned have far less value if any to a collector or dealer.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Banknotes

What is the value of a 1963 US 5 dollar bill with a red seal?

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Despite its age, 1963 $5 US Notes aren't considered rare. As of 10/2010 auction prices are in the range of face value to $7 for a bill in circulated condition. A nice uncirculated one can bring $15 to $18, though. The bill's red ink indicates that it's a United States Note, a form of currency that was issued from 1862 to 1966. They served the same purpose as Federal Reserve Notes, so the Treasury opted to consolidate all paper money under the Federal Reserve as a cost-saving move. The 1963 $5 United States Note (red seal) is worth $18-$20 in mint uncirculated condition and $5-$8 in fine quality. A normal, wrinkled, used note is worth exactly $5 in any store. Despite the bill's age and (by modern standards) unusual ink color, circulated ones aren't considered scarce. They might retail for $7-8 in average condition. If your bill is crisp and uncirculated it might retail for $15-18. Why red printing? The use of red ink indicates the bill is a United States Note, a type of currency issued up till 1966. US Notes were essentially identical to Federal Reserve Notes in terms of design, printing, distribution, and financial backing from the Treasury. Rather than continue to print two separate types of bills the Treasury decided that it would be more cost-effective to suspend printing of US Notes, and all bills are now green-seal Federal Reserve Notes. Serial numbers It's normally not necessary to provide a bill's serial number. Serial numbers are counters and a security feature but rarely affect a bill's value. Some collectors will pay extra for numbers with a special pattern, e.g. 12345678, or low numbers such as 00000015.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Coins

What is the value of a 1973 US quarter dollar?

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If its not a high grade mint state coin spend it. they're only worth a dollar in MS-63 condition
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Coins

What is the value of an 1889 US Morgan silver dollar?

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Look on the back of the coin to see if there's a small mint mark letter above the DO in DOLLAR. It may be blank or there may be a CC, O or S. (The M on the front of the coin is the designer's monogram and not a mint mark.) Numismedia lists the following approximate retail values as of 01/2013: No mint mark (Philadelphia): Very worn condition - $33 Moderately worn - $39 Slightly worn - $40 Almost no wear - $42 Uncirculated - $50 to $34,380 depending on quality "CC" mint mark (Carson City): Very worn - $506 Moderately worn - $900 Slightly worn - $1,310 Almost no wear - $8,424 Uncirculated - $22,810 to $937,500 "O" mint mark (New Orleans): Very worn - $33 Moderately worn - $39 Slightly worn - $40 Almost no wear - $50 Uncirculated - $130 to $20,000 "S" mint mark (San Francisco): Very worn - $36 Moderately worn - $52 Slightly worn - $60 Almost no wear - $110 Uncirculated - $192 to $29,380 DISCLAIMER: The retail values quoted are the best available as of the date shown, but may vary significantly due to changes in the precious metals market. Also the wholesale (buying) price of a coin will be less than the selling (retail) price. A reputable coin dealer will be able to give a more accurate valuation based on inspection of the coin. FAQ's about Morgan dollars E Pluribus Unum The motto E Pluribus Unum (Latin for "Out of Many, One") is on ALL $1 coins minted since 1878 so that's not specific enough to ID any one coin. Silver Eagles Silver eagles are bullion coins minted since 1986 for sale to collectors but not for spending. Morgan dollars were made for use in ordinary circulation just like dimes and quarters.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, Games

What number is at 3 o'clock on a dartboard?

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On most dartboards it is six (6), but some dartboards have concentric circles.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, Sony Playstation, US Coins

Is there any safe way to clean a coin?

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If you are hoping to improve their numismatic value, cleaning of any kind reduces the value of a coin. So in some short words, the answer is NO, STOP, DON'T. The best way is not to do so at all. Other than brushing off surface dirt with a very soft brush, or rinsing with distilled water and patting until thoroughly dry, the cleaning of coins (if done at all) should be left to professionals. Done incorrectly, cleaning a coin can drastically reduce its value. If the coin is very badly crudded up but valuable enough to make it worth the investment, e.g. you found it in an archaeological dig, there are professional cleaning technicians who have the tools and knowledge to restore the coin. Such techniques were used to remove 150 years of ocean calcification from the S.S. Pacific hoard, for example. If it has any possible value as a collectible, the best advice is DON'T clean it. Any abrasive cleaner, no matter how mild, will cause tiny scratches in the surface which will decrease its value to a collector dramatically. Chemical cleaners will alter the surface and give the coin an un-natural look. Some household cleaners will make a coin shiny-new looking when first cleaned but after a few months or years they look worse than before. However, any surface dirt SHOULD be removed before storing the coin in an airtight holder for preservation. Do this by letting it soak in soap (not detergent) and distilled water. Detergents and tap water usually contain contaminates that may react with the coin. Then use an artist's camel-hair brush to gently sweep away any loosened dirt and let the coin air dry on a soft cloth. If any additional cleaning is required, it should be done by an experienced professional conservator. In fact, most collectors and dealers will pay far less for a coin that's been cleaned than for one that's in its original condition, even if it's dirty. Think of what happens on Antiques Roadshow where someone proudly shows off the cleaning job they did on an old table. Then one of the Keno brothers tells them that they HAD a $20,000 antique, but their "fixing" with turpentine or whatever took its value down to $1,500.... Here is the best solution: DO NOT USE COIN CLEANERS LIKE BRASSO, TARNX, ETC!!!!!!!!Don't use any abrasive substance, or try to clean it by rubbing, scratching, or scraping! If you soak your coins, use distilled water, and you can add a bit of soap. however, the soap solution can damage proof coins or and upper-grade coins with copper in it. For coins that won't be damaged, rinse them thoroughly and air dry. Another solution is to soak a coin in olive oil for several months. The oil will eventually dissolve the crust. However, badly corroded coins have permanent damage inside. The same goes for ancient coins with patina on it. Acetone is usable, but use it in a well ventilated area. You can also use vinegar and let it soak. That will also clean it. As for Proof coins and Uncirculated coins, don't try to clean them. Get a replacement, or keep it as it is. Facts from Coin Collecting 101 (Alan Herbert) "If there is any possibility that these coins have any numismatic value, cleaning them will just reduce that value to the amount of silver they contain. They may look good when first cleaned (if you don't use a magnifier), but almost any coin that has been cleaned will look worse in a few years than it looked before the cleaning. Drying with a paper towel will leave hundreds of tiny scratches, destroying the natural surface." A Different Answer: Most of the friendus given so far concern themselves with any potential damge that may be done to the surface of the coin. Pristine uncirculated coins, proof coins and the such may suffer somewhat from improper cleaning methods, however, a tarnished silver or copper coin has already been damged even before you clean it. Tarnish is corrosion and even on silver it will leave tiny pits in the surface of the metal. The heavier the tarnish, the worse the pitting. This is why when an older coin is cleaned with chemicals the original luster never returns. So by cleaning a coin you probably do a little damage depending upon how you do it but in the end you are simply exposing the damage the tarnish/corrosion has already done. I don't know why so many collectors do not realize a tarnished coin is , in fact, damaged by the tarnish and thus should be worth less than the untarnished coin.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Banknotes

Can you see a 500000000 federal reserve bond 1934 series?

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No, you cannot. No such bond has ever been issued. Anything you do find with that denomination is either a fake or a novelty item.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Coins

What is the value of a 1908 buffalo nickel?

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Buffalo nickels were made from 1913 to 1938. Please check your coin again and post a new question.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, Confederate States of America

How much is a 1864 50 dollar confederate currency worth?

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Below is a price guide based on condition Good (Heavily Circulated. Possible tears, stains, holes. WORST CONDITION)= $45-55 Very Good- Fine (A well circulated note. Showing much folding and wrinkling. Minor stains but no major defects) = $55-$80 Very Fine-Extremely Fine (Some Circulation. Minor creases and folds. Somewhat clean and Chrisp)- $80-$120 Almost Uncirculated- (The note displays no evidence of being passed through general circulation. Could have ONE very minor fold in the corner or a slight mark. More than one impairment and it is not considered AU) = $120-$160 Uncirculated- Perfect- This is the highest grade. A note that has not been handled or passed through general circulation. Displays no folds, marks or pinholes. Generally this is the largest gap in value because uncirculated through perfect notes are always more difficult to obtain) = $160- $350 (Notes Grade as GEM or PERFECT are very rare and would bring considerably more) Any apparent Confederate paper money should be checked by an expert to make sure it's not a copy. Until the Hobby Protection Act required the word COPY to appear on reproductions, enormous numbers of replicas were printed. Many were sold as souvenirs; in the 1920s one firm gave away high-quality photocopies as promotional items.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Coins

What is the value of an 1844 CC US silver dollar?

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Please check the date and mint mark, and post a new question. The Carson City Mint only operated from 1870 to 1893. It's also possible you have a counterfeit. The market has been flooded with fakes, usually made in the Far East. Many are quite good and require an expert evaluation to detect, but there are a lot of really bad pieces out there as well, with impossible dates and/or designs. Two of the most common are: - Copies of the famous 1804 dollar. Genuine ones are worth millions. - An 1851 "Indian head dollar" created using a design borrowed from the famous Indian head cents first minted 8 years later in 1859.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, Gold and Precious Metals

Is Tibetan silver sterling silver?

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Not even close, Tibetan silver is more closely related to pewter. Tibetan silver only contains a small, small amount of pure silver, and many times things advertised as "Tibetan silver" contain no silver at all.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Coins

How much is a 1972 US penny worth in the year 2010?

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It's worth about a penny unless it is uncirculated, proof or has some sort of error such as a double impression or offset strike. If you just found it in pocket change for all practical purposes, it's worth 1 cent. Addition: All pre 1982, and some 1982 US Lincoln Cents are made of a 95% copper alloy. (coppers weigh 3.1G and Zincs 2.5)of course the 1943 steel is an exception. At current prices this makes the intrinsic value between two and three Cents, though it is contrary to Federal law to melt US Cents. They are being taken out of circulation pretty quickly, I've seen a decline in circulating copper Cents over the last year or two. So my advice is to put your copper Cents away, it is like an instant 100% ROI. If you choose to examine your Cents closely, you may find US Mint error and rare varietie coins that are worth far more. See the related link.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, Inflation

How much was 5 dollars worth in 1865?

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As of May 2014, $5 in 1865 was worth about $67. A dollar today would of been about $.08 in 1865.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Coins

What is a 1849 one cent coin worth?

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Assuming the coin is circulated, the 1849 Braided Hair Large Cent is a common date. For an accurate assessment of value the coin needs to be seen and graded. Most coins of this type have seen heavy use and show a lot of wear. In general retail values for low grade coins are $20.00-$26.00, better grade are $32.00-$64.00 and coins showing almost no wear run from $185.00-$220.00. Values are a market average and only for coins in collectible condition, coins that are bent, corroded, scratched or have been cleaned have far less value if any to a collector or dealer
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Coins

What is the value of a 1936 w mercury dime?

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The W "mint mark" The "W" seen on the obverse of this coin series is actually a stylized combination of the letters A and W, representing the coin's designer, Adolph A. Weinman. Updated Answer: August 9, 2009 The 1936 Mercury Dime was minted at 3 US mints: Philadelphia which is shown as 1936-P in this list; Denver which is shown as 1936-D in this list and San Francisco which is shown as 1936-S in this list. To determine which coin you have it will be necessary to locate the mint mark. This will be a small letter located on the reverse [tails] side of the coin just to the right of the letter "E" in the word "ONE". The letter "D" is for the Denver mint. The letter "S" is for the San Francisco mint. If there is no letter there, the coin was minted at Philadelphia. Please note, the world price for silver bullion has an effect upon the values of most circulated coins in this list. The circulated and uncirculated values for this coin are shown in the following list: Circulated Grades.........1936-P............1936-D.............1936-S G4..................................$4.....................$5....................$4 F12.................................$4.....................$6....................$4 EF40...............................$5.....................$10...................$5 Uncirculated Grades MS60................................$12..................$28...................$25 MS63................................$15..................$37...................$29 MS65................................$23..................$52...................$38 MS67................................$85..................$375.................$340
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Banknotes

What is a three dollar 1864 confederate bond worth?

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If it's legit (meaning it's confederate) then you got some money comin. All real confederate money is rare. Rare enoungh to inflate their worth 3000% sometimes. Many imitation Confederate notes were made, and made to look old. Most will have 'Facsimile' in small print on the bottom (usually) of one side.
Asked in US Coins, Coins and Paper Money

What was the last year US silver coins were minted?

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1964 was the last year that circulating U.S. coins were struck in 90% silver. The composition of U.S. coins has changed considerably over the past few decades. Because of a growing worldwide silver shortage, the Coinage Act of 1965 authorized a change in the composition of dimes, quarters, and half-dollars, which had been 90 percent silver. Silver was eliminated from the dime and the quarter. The half-dollar's silver content was reduced to 40 percent and, after 1970, was eliminated altogether. This applies ONLY to coins minted for everyday use with the general public. The US Mint is still minting yearly sets of SILVER PROOF Coins that you can purchase from them if you'd like. Other denominations All dollar coins dated 1971 and later are either cupronickel or brass. Nickels have always been made from copper and nickel, except during WW2 when they contained a small amount of silver. There has never been a 90% silver nickel. For circulating coinage: -- Dimes and quarters were 90% silver until 1964, and clad copper (that is, no silver) from 1965 onwards. -- Half dollars were 90% silver until 1964, 40% silver 1965-1970, and clad after that -- Silver dollars were 90% silver through 1935 and not made again until 1971. There were some 40% silver ones made for collectors, but circulation dollars were made of clad copper-nickel until 1999. The "golden" dollars came along in 2000 - but they're brass, and contain neither silver nor gold. The mint continues to make silver commemorative and bullion coins, as well as silver versions of dimes, quarters and half dollars, for collectors - these are sold at a premium to face value and are unlikely to ever be found in pocket change.