Cathedral and Church History

A cathedral is a Christian church that houses the bishop, while a church is a structure or building that facilitates the meeting of Jesus Christ’s followers. Their history can be traced back to the apostolic times.

Asked in Religion & Spirituality, Cathedral and Church History

What is a cathedral official?

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one who takes care of the church!! First of all a cathedral is a cathedral and is never called a church. Cathedral and church officials vary, and could be deans, archdeacons, etc..it is a committee that takes care of religious buildings,
Asked in Marriage, Christianity, Cathedral and Church History

Can a church minister get married?

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In the New Testiment it states that married and not married men can can be church leaders. Of Jesus first followrs like Peter; were married, yet did not have with their wives after. When Martin Luther created the first church to break off from the Catholic one, even he was surprized when he decided to get married.
Asked in Middle Ages, Crusades, Cathedral and Church History

Why are most swords shaped like a cross?

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Actually, many swords are not shaped like a cross, but swords like scimitars and sabers are curved. As for straight swords, many are shaped like very elongated crosses. The hand-guard at the top, by the handle, is intended to keep your hand from sliding down the blade from sweat, injuring you, and it prevents the other man's blade from hitting your hand. The blade and handle make up the large part of the sword with the hand-guard near the handle end. The shape of a cross wasn't entirely intentional, it just happened to be the most convenient shape to mass-produce, while keeping the hands of the wielder safe.
Asked in Britain in WW2, Cathedral and Church History

What do cathedrals look like?

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Cathedrals are very large churches. Their appearance depends on when and where they were built. Usually they were stone, but some were brick. Many were highly decorated, but some were relatively undecorated. In general they were very big, and many were positively huge. There is a link below, at which there are pictures.
Asked in Henry VIII, Cathedral and Church History

What other names is Henry VIII church given?

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The Church of England (c of e) and the Anglican Church.
Asked in History of England, Cathedral and Church History

What is the function of Westminster Abbey?

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It is primarily a house of worship, like any church or cathedral. It is also the location for coronations, weddings of the prominent, funerals of the prominent.
Asked in Cathedral and Church History

What do you call church singers?

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church choir members. They are choristers
Asked in Cathedral and Church History

How many gargoyles are in the Notre Dame Cathedral?

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In the Notre Dame Cathedral there are five thousand (5,000) gargoyles.
Asked in History of England, Ancient History, Cathedral and Church History

Why was becket killed?

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IF YOU MEAN THOMAS BECKET: There were a couple of friendus. 1. A first argument with King Henry the Second. Henry made Becket the Archbishop of Canterbury, hoping he would help him reform the church courts. But he did not. Instead, he made God his new master. 2. A second argument. Becket began to excommunicate (sack) all the monks who followed Henry in the Cathedral of their jobs. Once again, this made Henry furious, causing him to fly into a rage.
Asked in Cathedral and Church History

When was the Seville cathedral built?

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The groundbreaking was in 1401 and the consecration in 1507... so it took about 100 years to complete.
Asked in Cathedral and Church History

What is the difference between a basilica... a cathedral... an oratory and a church?

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In the Roman Catholic Church, a basilica is a designation for an important church building. A basilica is designated by the pope to buildings that carry special spiritual, historical, and architectural significance. Once a basilica -- always a basilica. A basilica may or may not also be the cathedral of the diocese. This is the highest permanent designation for a church building. The word basilica derives from a style of church based on the old roman basilicas which were houses of Law. A cathedral is a church which holds a bishop's throne (called cathedra). It means it is the central church of his diocese. A cathedral may or may not be a basilica. It is the home church for the bishop or archbishop of a Catholic diocese. A cathedral may not always be a cathedral, depending on the decisions of the bishop. Hierarchally, the cathedral is the most important church of a diocese. A church is a building in which the public sacrifice of the Mass takes place. An oratory is more like a chapel, which is a place where people celebrate private Masses. An oratory is a structure other than a parish church, set aside by Church authority for prayer and the celebration of Mass. Examples would be chapels in airports and colleges where all of the functions of a parish aren't required. Private chapels are permitted in Catholicism, but if Church authority had not sanctioned their particular creation, they are chapels, not oratories. All of these are churches in that they have a consecrated altar and are used for celebrating the Sacraments.
Asked in History of France, France, Cathedral and Church History

Why was Notre Dame Cathedral built?

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Maurice de Sully, bishop of Paris, decided to build a new cathedral for the expanding population, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Although construction started in 1163, it was not completed until roughly 80 years later in about 1240s. Built in an age of illiteracy, the cathedral retells the stories of the Bible in its portals, paintings, and stained glass. It has over 4,999 gargoles and has priceless paintings.
Asked in Christianity, Ancient Rome, Cathedral and Church History

What is a basilica?

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The Latin word basilica (derived from Greek, Basiliké Stoà, Royal Stoa), was originally used to describe a Roman public building (as in Greece, mainly a tribunal), usually located in the forum of a Roman town. In Hellenistic cities, public basilicas appeared in the 2nd century BC. Basilicas were also used for religious purposes. The remains of a large subterranean Neopythagorean basilica, dating from the 1st century, were found near the Porta Maggiore in 1915; the stuccoes on the interior vaulting have survived, though their exact interpretation remains a matter for debate. The groundplan of Christian basilicas in the 4th century were similar to that of this Neopythagorean basilica, which had three naves, and an apse. After the Roman Empire became officially Christian, the term came by extension to specifically refer to a large and important church that has been given special ceremonial rites by the Pope. Thus the word retains two senses today, one architectural and the other ecclesiastical.
Asked in History, Politics & Society, History of France, France, Cathedral and Church History

How long did it take to build Notre Dame?

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There are many cathedrals named "Notre Dame," both in France and in other French-speaking countries. The cathedral known as Notre Dame de Paris was built between 1172-1340. The cathedral known as Notre Dame de Chartres, as it stands today, was built between 1194 and 1260.
Asked in Cathedral and Church History

What is a triforium in a Cathedral?

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A shallow gallery of arches within the thickness of an inner wall above the Nave
Asked in School Subjects, UK Religion and Spirituality, Cathedral and Church History

Why is southwell diocese important to the national school?

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because the national school started in the gates of St. Marys Magdalene church which is part of the southwell / Nottingham diocese.
Asked in Cathedral and Church History

What is the interior volume st paul's cathedral london?

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The answer is....... 152 000 m3 For all those wondering how many wine gums that represents, it's 140,000,000,000 give or take the odd wine gum :)